15

There is now official documentation for the Bluetooth protocol used by the Powered Up product line: https://github.com/LEGO/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs The community has created some tools to interact directly with Powered Up and Boost hubs. Here is one example: https://github.com/nathankellenicki/node-poweredup That tool supports basically every ...


10

Each train needs the following two components: Hub Train motor I'll assume you purchased a second set of these to convert your 9V train with, since you're asking how to control both trains using the same remote. The LEGO Powered Up team has provided an FAQ for Powered Up which contains instructions for how to pair multiple Powered Up Smarthubs with one ...


9

The bulk of the space inside the Powered Up hub is consumed by the housing for the 6 AAA batteries. A small portion of the top of the hub contains the main printed circuit board. Here's how it looks removed from the hub: And here's another shot showing the back: The main chip is very similar to the one used in Boost. It uses an STM32F030 from ST ...


8

LEGO calls this communication protocol the "LEGO Wireless Protocol" (LWP). The documentation is publicly available at https://lego.github.io/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs/. There is also a GitHub repository that provides the source of this website at https://github.com/LEGO/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs. Because of this, it seems reasonable to expect ...


8

Let's take a look. The first step to disassembling the motor is removing the small Philips screw on the bottom: Now there are a pair of gray tabs in the back white section that we need to release. I found it easiest to cut them down with a knife. Once those are free, the white section slides backwards away from the motor. Try to do this gently, as there are ...


7

As of the Powered Up app version 3.0, this is possible. Old answer: As of August 2018, this is not possible. However, TLG has stated that they plan to add more compatibility to the Powered Up system, and this will likely be available as a firmware update in the future: Q. Will all different Powered Up components (Boost, WeDo, Train, etc) be able to ...


7

There's a node.js library that can connect to the Move Hub and control attached peripherals: https://github.com/nathankellenicki/node-poweredup This should allow you to write scripts and programs that can control the motor from your Mac.


6

Official docs: https://lego.github.io/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs/ https://github.com/LEGO/lego-ble-wireless-protocol-docs Discussion: https://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/162288-powered-up-a-tear-down/&page=3 Inofficial modules: NodeJS: https://github.com/nathankellenicki/node-poweredup Python: https://pypi.org/project/...


6

Haven't done the 10254 yet with powered up, but have converted several other trains... The train motors have the exact same dimensions and the powered-up smart hub has the same dimensions as the battery box of the power functions system. What's different is that you don't need the space for the IR receiver and that the motor is immediately connected to the ...


5

There do not appear to be any compatible connectors available currently. You can obviously splice cables from the official components, but that's expensive and makes those components unusable. I hope that someone has a better answer, but the best that I've been able to do so far is to use a modified SATA connector. I first saw this in a video that ...


5

There is an alternative app called BrickController 2. It is available for both Android as well as iOS. This application is actively developed and its maintainer can be reached on Eurobricks forums. You can also report and discuss any issues there. The application is universal compared with solution offered by LEGO since one device allows you to control ...


4

M Motor (Powered Up/WeDo 2.0) The M motor has a 2.2kΩ resistor between pins 5 and 6. Pin 6 is connected directly to pin 3. LED Lights I don't own any lights yet, but according to this post, they also use a 2.2kΩ resistor, but in this case it is between pins 5 and 3. This pulls ID 1 to ground. Here's the full circuit diagram: Train motor The measured ...


4

This isn't currently available. The Powered Up team responded to a question about this in May 2019. The gist is that they were able to say that the removable battery holder in the hub was designed with a future rechargeable battery in mind. This can also be inferred directly from the design: They cited several reasons that this isn't yet available, ...


4

They are in a perforated bag and the entire contents of the bag is listed. You only need some of them in this step and in a few steps later on. I think such bag is called an "accessory" bag and it is common to have the instructions like this for such bag. The first set that comes to mind that did the same was the Big Ben 10253 where on step 269 on page 187 ...


4

I've tried attaching one of the Powered up motors from the batmobile set (76112) This motor looks identical to me as the WeDo motor (although brickset and bricklink don't list them as identical at the time of this writing) I could not get it to work, all profiles of the fixed build models complain that the external motor is not attached. The free build ...


4

The current line of Powered Up components uses AAA batteries. The Powered Up team has indicated that both regular or rechargeable batteries should work fine. You will need 10 AAA batteries to control one train with the included remote, or 6 if you are using a smart device as your remote. Here's the battery layout shown in the instructions:


3

Lego now sell Boost compatible motors separately https://shop.lego.com/en-NZ/product/Medium-Linear-Motor-88008


3

No, a smart device is not required to control train sets 60197 and 60198. These include a standalone Powered Up remote control: This provides much of the same functionality as a smart device. From the FAQ: The LEGO® Powered Up remote control works a lot like how you would use your smart device (mobile phone or tablet for example) to control any other ...


3

Since June 2019, this is possible. See here: https://www.hispabrickmagazine.com/content/2019/06/03/powered-up-ii-powered-up-ii-networks/ Look right at the bottom of the article. The latest version of the Powered Up app (2.2.0) as well as the latest version of the Boost app include new firmware for the Boost hub. After this update it is possible to ...


3

There is at least one third-party Power Functions to Powered Up adapter available that can be used for this purpose: Here's a video demonstrating it in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96SxM-0UkVQ


2

With current hardware, the answer is 10. From the trains FAQ: You can run up to 10 trains at the same time from one remote control. There are 5 channels on the remote control (you can tell them apart by their different colors), and with each channel you can control 2 Smarthubs in separate trains with motors plugged in – as long as on one train the motor ...


2

Your mileage may vary, but according to LEGO, the range is about 10m (33ft) in open air. The Bluetooth signal distance is usually around 10 meters/33 feet in an open area, but it can vary, depending on a few things: Low batteries in the remote control, and obstacles – concrete walls, for example – may decrease the signal distance. Try to remove obstacles, ...


2

On February 2020, this has been possible for a while now, and have been playing with it. (Power Up app version 3.0)


2

I'm not sure exactly what you are looking for in terms of a spec, but here's the pinout from the Eurobricks thread mentioned by Alexander O'Mara with some help from this post: Pin 1 - Motor Pin 2 - Motor Pin 3 - GND (0v) Pin 4 - VCC (3.3v) Pin 5 - ID 1 Pin 6 - ID 2 The basic spec for motors is that they are given continuous 3.3V power on pins 3 and 4, ...


2

All you should have to do is connect pins 1 and 2 between the two motors. One motor will have all six wires connected and serve as the primary in order to give the hub something that it can properly identify. The second motor can simply piggyback off of the primary and share control voltages that are meant for the primary motor. Essentially, you can leave ...


2

As far as I know, this is not possible using the current stock firmware. The battery box can only pair with one device. The UI on the battery box is a single button, and for simplicity the device is either in a mode where it is looking for a device to pair with (flashing light) or already paired (solid light). There isn't a way to pair it with another device ...


2

You can attach second train motor to B output. However it will be controlled independently from motor attached to output A. So you would need to control speed for each motor separately. Speaking of traction. The key thing here is your train weight. You might consider putting another full battery box (unpowered) into train just to increase weight and get ...


2

Th easiest solution is to just use port "B" on the rear engine and then turn the "B" side remote control panel 180 degrees. They will then both go the same direction for "up" or "down". You may even find that having the rear motor 1 click lower than the front is advantageous so it isn't pushing too much in turns, trying to buckle the train.


2

According to the LEGO Customer service website, you can control multiple train with the remote control, but not the app. Currently the Powered Up App only controls one Powered Up Hub at a time. Source: https://www.lego.com/en-MY/service/help-topics/digital/device-guides/powered-up/control-multiple A more specific answer can be found in the LEGO City website:...


1

I can confirm that using something like jncranton suggested (a third-party library that speaks to PoweredUp devices over bluetooth), you can use a computer to control several PoweredUp devices at once. The limit seems to be the number of devices your Bluetooth will pair with. The Remote is a smart hub like the battery box so each remote counts as one ...


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