11

Absolutely it will. The yellowing is caused by exposure to UV light, which it will get more of with direct sunlight shining on it. If it has to be in the window you could look at some glass coverings that block some of the UV, or find a home for it else where under electric light.


5

Disclaimer: I don't own the set in question and I'm not affiliated with anyone selling products mentioned below. Searching in Google for "lego taj mahal acrylic cover" reveals a staggering selection of acrylic dust covers clearly intended for this specific model. Judging by the supply side I can only conclude that the demand side of the market must ...


4

Generally, I think it doesn't add much value. But it depends. Some sets, like US version of 8284, have extra parts crucial for alternative model (aka B-model). So unless you include them, you are selling incomplete set. The inclusion of all parts to build all models is part of "complete" condition description on Bricklink. Extra parts excluded ...


4

During the 90's I was gifted older LEGO bricks from a friend of my parents that were about 30 years old. Many were discolored, warped and specifically the blue and gray pieces would break if flexed. 30 years forward and some of pieces from my 90's mix are discolored specifically gray, blue, white, yellow, brown. I think there is shelf life of about 30 ...


4

Lego bricks typically turn yellow due to a chemical change that occurs when UV light interacts with flame-retardants in the plastic. So bricks stored in darkness shouldn't turn yellow at all.


4

Should be Fine The sealing process, at least in the new bags without perforation, keeps the bricks safe from aging. The Taj Mahal should be just fine, and even opened, my Imperial Shuttle bricks are great! In fact, all the newer bricks, 2003-2007, seem to be pretty yellow-proof. You'll typically only find those in much older sets. Yellowing occurs because of ...


2

Generally for this sort of thing the recommendation is a "light machine oil" (the wording from the Hornby Maintenance sheets). These are "non-penetrating" and so won't damage the plastics which might happen with 3-in-1 or WD-40 style oils. This can often be found as "Sewing Machine Oil". Fleischmann (a model railway brand) sell ...


2

There are many LEGO customizers who do custom printing, however please note that all printing makes sense only if hundreds of the same design are requested. Otherwise there is quite a bit of work involved with designing, formatting, color-matching and aligning each print. However if you have the money and willing to pay a few hundred bucks set-up fee for ...


2

No, Lego does not sell custom printed bricks in small quantities (I suspect if you wanted thousands of the same design it would be a different story). To get your search to work you need to use the advanced features, specifically by removing results that contain 3D: print on ABS plastic -3D That turns up mostly links on screen printing, which would be ...


1

Petroleum based lubricants you need to be careful with, since they can act as solvents. Zhaph mentioned non-penetrating machine oil, this sounds like a safe bet. If you are in doubt, grab a gnawed brick and submerge it in a sample for a few days and see what happens before putting it on your precious train parts. Science! Second hand info: I have heard that ...


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