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20

As far as regular sets go (ie. no furniture or big-boxes like that Chima combo), the current UCS Millennium Falcon does appear to be the largest box by total volume. 75192-1 Millennium Falcon - UCS (2nd edition) 54 x 45 x 39 cm = 94770 cm3 54 x 45 cm = 2430 cm2 The original UCS Millennium Falcon box was actually larger in 2 directions however, though the ...


14

Maybe straining the definition a little (although not too much, as at-least some of them did come with LEGO pieces), LEGO has in the past sold furniture. I think all of these items were shipped disassembled, and I can't find much information on exactly how large the box they came in was and can't be sure what I did find is accurate, but I would imagine one ...


13

You've already discovered yourself two good ways: count by ten put elements on large surface by type The latter technique can be extended to an art called "knolling": Place all elements by type in right lines with right angles on a large surface... Its a very relaxing exercise and fun in its own right. Checking completeness becomes trivial, building ...


11

Straining the definition a little less than Alexander, some of the First LEGO League challenges came in boxes with the mat folded, making the box unexceptional, but some came in boxes with the mat rolled up. According to bricklink the 2015 challenge came in a box that was 117 cm long. That is quite a bit more than any of the dimensions of the Millenium ...


9

I don't know whether this quite qualifies as a set, but there is a LEGO promotional Christmas box from 1964 listed on bricklink


8

Apparently these are designed and distributed by a Venice shop holder, named Steve http://havetwinswilltravel.com/2018/09/11/lego-shop/


8

Yes there is. However, it requires two pieces of knowledge: You need to understand how BrickLink or BrickSet categorize the 10,000+ types of LEGO bricks in existence. This means knowing the difference between a Brick, a Plate and a Tile, understanding the various Modified versions of these basic types etc. You need to be able to identify pieces in your ...


8

I'm going to stretch your definition of "set" and say "32x32 green baseplate". You could get set 745-1 in 1978... ...then 840-1 in 1980, then 813-1 in 1986, then 626-1 in 1996: And since 2015 there's 10700-1, altough it seems that the shade of green is different than the previous iterations: Since those sets have exactly the same piece count (one) and ...


8

Everything's going according to plan. Check out Youtuber Sariel's review on your set HERE. At about 26mins in, he addresses your concern. He notes the looseness of the feet when fully deployed, and says there are 4 pads stored in a compartment over the front axle. Just build on.


7

I thought that promotional boxed sets were good candidates for the smallest box as well, as I own a 1630-1 Helicopter (which, incidentally, I got as a promotional gift for buying toothpaste at some point in the 90s IIRC), at 7 x 7 x 4.5 cm (220cm3/0.22 litres). There are sets with similar dimensions as well, such as 5018-1 Gravity Games Promotional Set at 7 ...


7

There have been Christmas-themed sets for a long time, for example set 246-2 Santa and Sleigh from 1977. Scrolling through all LEGO sets on Brickset, starting from 1949, shows that this is also the first set in their records that is Christmas themed, together with the (likely unreleased) two Santas set 245-2.


7

The EV3 expansion set 45560 comes to mind: https://education.lego.com/en-us/products/lego-mindstorms-education-ev3-expansion-set-by-lego-education/45560 Although intended as a extension to the educational EV3 set, it's mainly technic elements.


7

It might be impossible to give the precise number simply because some older sets are yet to be found and new ones are being added with a slight delay. These three are the major websites having the most details about sets: Bricklink catalog has 15824 sets in its catalog. Brickset has 16378 sets. Rebrickable has 15432 sets. As you can see numbers are ...


6

I'm afraid there's no real way to definitely answer such a question; considering this pertains to LEGO's marketing strategy which is not public. However, there are some insights we can gather from existing sets: Licenses must be negotiated. As such, sets from licenses LEGO already has (Disney, Marvel, DC, for example) are easier for LEGO to produce since ...


6

I don’t think there is a consensus, as much as there isn’t a consensus of what constitutes “rare” (is it availability at release, production volume, current market availability?) or what is considered a “set” (is a collectible minifigure a set?). Also, how far back do you want to go? Are LEGO sets from the 50s and 60s included, even the one-piece cars? From ...


6

This question is nearly impossible to answer with all the variables. You might consider refining your question to a more realistic scope by eliminating sets like "Inside Tour Exclusives", Comic Con Exclusives, single minifigures like the gold C-3PO, or employee exclusives. While probably not the "rarest" set out there, the 5004590 "Bat Pod" is annoyingly ...


6

I would suggest looking at a speed build of this model and comparing the placement of pieces with that of your own. So, let's try...this guy's video => The Austrian Lego Fan seems to have banged out a step by step build of this model, which shows a many angles of the area you're have issues with. To get those butt-dragging results, you may have got your ...


6

There was a Technic sub-theme called Universal that was available mostly in the 1980's. The sets did come with instructions to build as many as 4 different models, but each model rarely used all the parts. The models were more of a demonstration of how to use the parts in interesting ways. You can browse the sets in the Technic Universal theme here: https:/...


6

This might sound crazy, but: JUST BUILD IT!! Follow the instructions step by step and you will see when something is missing. You can make a copy of the instructions and strike out every part you have used if you have trouble keeping track.


6

From a train point of view those wheels will fit happily within the guides of the bridge, and the connections on the tracks should just about fit as well. I'm fairly sure we bought our bridge when we were staying in a holiday cottage that had a load of the old black track, and it connected to the track successfully, but you may need to work with some curves ...


5

I have always assumed that the pieces in question were place holders to simplify assembly. Their bright color and location help insure proper alignment for less experienced builders. One must realize that the set is marketed to 6-12 year old's. I imagine their testing has proven that such aides are very useful for younger builders.


5

I emailed TLG: These changes are different as it is how Disney would like it be displayed. Prior to a set release, each set goes through a number of reviews. One of these, is our designers show Disney the boxes for them to sign off on and approve, after they review the boxes. For each set, they said the boxes were approved for release! It does ...


5

I don’t have an answer to why they stopped, but this site is trying to get instructions together for all the old stuff. www.backoftheboxbuilds.com


5

1 . According to experimental results, a single Lego 2x2 brick can support about 950 pounds before failing. This does not take the shape of the model into account - if you have a sharp point going down into the brick, it's probably going to fail a bit more quickly!


5

Checking part inventory for this set on Rebrickable I found following part to be unique: 10169 - Minifigure, Utensil Sack / Bag with Handle in Green Review posted on New Elementary also suggest pilot's torso and legs are new/unique prints. The rest seem to be released in other sets. Some parts are quite old or have been produced in small number of sets.


4

Although the stand-alone, unlicensed Space theme technically remains discontinued, LEGO has recently released an unlicensed Space sub-theme under their City theme. While these builds seem to be more "near future" than the classic Space sets, they can be whatever you want them to be. This is LEGO we are talking about, use your imagination to figure out how ...


4

You're describing rebrickable: https://rebrickable.com/ Besides official models, also hundreds of fan created models are available. It's a terrific resource


4

I found a YouTube video which has pictures for each page in the instruction booklets. The quality is pretty good and each step is readable.


3

Lego bricks can be purchased individually from Lego.com using their Pick-A-Brick service. https://www.lego.com/en-us/page/static/pick-a-brick?icmp=HP-SHQL-EG-NO-pick-a-120 If you have an official Lego Store near you then buying bricks from their Pick-A-Brick Wall is a less expensive option once you figure out how to maximize the amount of bricks you ...


3

Based on a comment found in the overview on Brickset, and that all of the others levers and their function seem to be accounted for, it seem very likely that it is the transmission gear selector. -UPDATE BELOW- From Brickset: "A new transmission system has two levers for engaging high or low ratios and a selector for changing gear – LEGO Technic’...


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