21

You're probably the only one who can answer that question, but here are a few thoughts anyway. If you're interested in mechanic complexity and how machines work, Technic is indeed a good way to go. And as you hint, it can evolve into robotics, whether with a NXT or with anything else you fancy. If you're after building complexity, I wouldn't recommend the ...


19

The usual phrases I've seen include some mixture of the following: Universal interlocking bricks Modular building system Plastic construction toy blocks and so on... But don't forget adding "Compatible with leading brands" if it is indeed the case :)


18

Brickset allows you to export a search as .CSV and appears to include prices for all regularly available sets - this does exclude promotional sets (i.e. in-store, newspaper vouchers, magazine gifts, partner stores, or VIP/special offers) and educational sets (only available through specialist educational retailers), or pick-a-brick/model options. Running a ...


17

Garage-sales, estate-sales, second-hand stores, flea-markets and graigslists are the most common way to source out used LEGO. This is especially true in neighborhoods where there is a LEGO store nearby so a lot of kids have them, or where LEGO is popular in the community in general (suburbs and middle-class neighborhoods are especially great places to scout)....


16

You have three basic choices, depending on how much time you want to spend: Sell the collection as-is (with as much honest description as you can muster and great photos if you're selling on-line). Sort the collection into sets and sell them as-is with parts / figs missing. Sort into sets and replace missing parts / figs. These three are not mutually ...


15

Selling used LEGO is definitely legal, at least in most legal systems. One of the most basic property rights involves the right to transfer ownership as long as both parties agree on the terms. Even selling items under copyright (instructions, box art, games, etc) is legal under the first-sale doctrine. I don't see any reason that any of the 3 things that ...


14

The LEGO Shop online website has a page where you can see which sets are marked as 'Retiring Soon'. USA - LEGO Shop UK - LEGO Shop


13

BrickLink is by far the best place to buy LEGO. It is also very easy to use. Once you get how it works, you will never look back. There are several very helpful videos on YouTube showing you how to use BrickLink most efficiently. Here is one: http://youtu.be/Cyat8aFVk_k I have also put together a detailed written guide on how to use BrickLink here: http://...


13

Yes, you can. Or at least I've been able to reuse mine in the past. I believe it was $0.50 off for the big cup and $0.25 for the small cup.


13

As a conservative approach I would suggest the LEGO Juniors series which has cars and other sets and that are easy to build. However, from first hand experience I can tell that kids learn quickly. Even if reading instructions is too difficult, playing with regular LEGO parts will soon be a lot of fun. Besides : Losing small parts will be an issue with ...


12

The LEGO Store has the Pick-a-Brick service, which allows you to bulk buy elements, up to 999 of any one element apparently. It's not necessarily the cheapest, for example 2x4's are GBP£0.19 each, so purchasing 999 of them would cost me £189.81 plus shipping - there's no obvious savings/discounts for bulk ordering. As Refro points out, BrickLink might be a ...


12

A brief search led me to a very thorough blog post by Ruth Suehle on GeekMom, which includes the data and a Graph: Does It Feel Like Lego Bricks Just Keep Getting More Expensive? In her findings, she found that average cost per piece in 2011 is about US$0.12, down from a high in the '80s of about US$0.40 - these prices were adjusted for inflation, etc. ...


12

You probably came across BrickLink. They sell pretty much anything LEGO related, including original boxes and instruction books.


12

LEGO bricks aren't suitable for children under 3 as they are considered a potential choking hazard. LEGO also sell a DUPLO brand of construction toys which are twice the size of regular bricks. DUPLO bricks are designed for children aged 1½ to 5 years old.


12

I am not aware of any sellers that do this, but if you like to assemble discontinued sets, bricklink has a feature that allows you to do this using bricklink seller inventories. Just look up the set on bricklink, add the Inventory to your wishlist and review which sellers have the pieces you need, then order them. Go to the "Wanted" tab on Bricklink: http://...


12

Not going to argue with the reason for the request, but here are some options that give (close to) the best price per part: Any classic brick box typically gives you a less than $0.05 per part price. Getting those on discount can get you even lower. (E.g. 10704 when on sale at WM in the US was $20 for 900 bricks - or a little over $0.02 per brick). Special ...


11

Sets from the Classic line tend to have a good value in terms of cost per brick. The trade-off is that you don't get a large model to build in many advanced pieces.


11

Brickowl.com is another Bricklink-style site with an updated interface and easier shopping experience that you should check out. The interface is well designed and they have a feature built-in that allows you to find the best combo of stores for the parts in your wishlist, then add them all to your cart at once. It even gives you a total + shipping!


11

I say this as having been a model railroader (http://zoorail.wordpress.com) for more than 10 years. You will never get the level of detail, scale or even perhaps value with Lego railroad sets as compared to normal model railroading but I just bought two Lego Train sets 7939 and 3677 and was blown away by the care that has not only gone into how they look but ...


11

I'd say that an initial HO scale set was probably cheaper than a LEGO version, although a direct comparison isn't easy, and it can rapidly get out of hand once you start adding more elements in. Initial Purchases The closest I can find is probably comparing 7939 LEGO Cargo Train, which is currently selling in the LEGO shop for £130: With something like ...


11

It's an interesting question. As Joubarc stated there are multiple approaches here. But from my personal experience I would recommend a graduated approach into the Lego Technic. You should start with the sets on this page to see it you can find any kind of interest and to ensure you are not simply discouraged by the Lego Technic models. If you enjoyed the ...


11

LEGO Group also did a range called LEGO Baby or Primo, which was pretty much suitable from birth. It's not currently in production, but does come up on ebay and the like now and again, and is slightly inter-usable with Duplo and hence standard LEGO blocks. Items ranged from things like this rattle, with chewable petals: To the more "advanced" building ...


11

Here are the two things that I would recommend: Get yourself a big set if you have the budget for it. These will have a large variety of pieces and once you've built the models from the instructions you'll have a good understanding of a lot of different building techniques. Watch eBay or similar sites for large lots of Technic parts by the pound. These can ...


11

I raised this same question on Reddit. Two people over there pointed out that the website was actually selling pants instead of LEGO. So I just tried to access the website through https://hide.me/en/proxy. When I use their Dutch proxy, the site can't be loaded at all. When I use their American proxy, the site is shop for pants. When I use their German ...


10

You can indeed take bricks and purchase them. I've listed the main types of Pick-A-Brick in this answer: The LEGO retail outlets house a matrix of bins, each filled with a certain type of brick. The bricks used tend be excess bricks from LEGO's own factories and some bricks of the same kind may be included in more than one bin. Bricks are packed ...


10

Besides the options mentioned above there is a lugbulk program targeted at afols. If your a member of a LUG you might be able to order bricks that way. Typically the prices are lower than if you order via the Lego stores. As an alternative you could use bricklink to get the desired amounts.


10

I built a page to locate good deals on bulk LEGO by filtering through eBay results using a custom algorithm. As others have said, eBay can be a cost effective way to pick up bulk bricks. Unfortunately, it can be tedious to weed through the expensive or spammy items to find just the bulk LEGO. This web app takes some of this work away by calculating price ...


10

The number of parts shown on the box of the LEGO set indicate how many parts are included without the spare parts. Spare parts tend to be added for the smallest pieces of a set that can be lost easily. Spare parts tend to be fairly consistent between identical sets regardless of where they are sold and sets with a greater amount of parts will generally have ...


10

Good question, and welcome to LEGO Answers! Assuming you are going to break up your collection but not sort it into sets, you will likely get more money for your collection if you sell it in smaller lots sorted by color. You can get a sense for what different colors are worth per pound by searching completed listings on eBay. However, I don't believe that ...


10

Yes, you can buy all the electronic parts by themselves, but given that the electronic parts are the bulk of the cost, you may not save much. The MINDSTORMS EV3 set (MSRP $349.99 USD) contains: 1 - EV3 Intelligent Brick (MSRP $189.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Color Sensor (MSRP $39.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Infrared Sensor (MSRP $29.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Touch Sensor (MSRP $19.99 USD) ...


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