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7

Tom Alphin has a template of labels you can download and print with the appropriate label printer. Sample:


7

I can't speak to "best". But as a point of reference, many many of my lego tires are many years old and they are usually stored on rims. The older tires were often not removable from the rims. As I rarely build cars, I take no special care of the tires, and I've found that there doesn't seem to be any particular problems. The rubber ages over time, but this ...


7

Generally yes, as long as: there are no electronics inside (like Power Functions, Mindstorms, etc.) the temperature stays below freezing you allow plenty of time in dry environment to thaw out No, if the temperature rides up and down and you want to keep the box and paper booklet intact - it will draw moisture with each thaw cycle. No if electronics, ...


7

Very specific to your region (and mine): The ALDI chain carries the following hobby sorting drawers from time to time (about once a year): They are very cheap, about 7 Euro for each type and they are VERY popular with AFOLs in Belgium and the Netherlands. Unfortunately it is hard to predict when ALDI offers these and they are often sold out immediately.


7

I don't have that particular set, but going through the instructions in reverse order and storing the parts in numbered bags will produce the most like-new rebuilding experience. You can even put everything back in the original box and store it that way. The big weakness with this method is that you can't really use those parts for anything else. That's ...


6

Try "Iris storage drawer" on amazon.co.uk. They sell transparent drawers and boxes in several sizes. These (3 large drawers or 6 small drawers) cost about 30 pounds. They are similar to the system that Jangbricks in his LEGO parts tour is showing.


6

Disclaimer: I don't own the set in question and I'm not affiliated with anyone selling products mentioned below. Searching in Google for "lego taj mahal acrylic cover" reveals a staggering selection of acrylic dust covers clearly intended for this specific model. Judging by the supply side I can only conclude that the demand side of the market must ...


6

The 75192 Millenium Falcon has 7513 Parts (as I'm sure you know) and so you're going to need to a lot of space to be able to store it. While there are lots of great databases for LEGO parts and sets there isn't anybody who organized parts lists based on the bags in the instructions. So you're going to be dealing with all of the parts from all of the bags ...


5

You can try to use www.bricklabels.com It allows you to select which parts you want to print and allows you to print the labels in your custom size, fitting the drawers perfectly. Full disclosure: I made the app :-/, but it's free and open-source: https://github.com/Gottwik/legolabels


5

An honourable mention should go to the forthcoming IKEA / LEGO joint storage solution - BYGGLEK These will arrive in store in October 2020, and consist of plastic boxes in various sizes, with a studded top, and 'label' in front. Details on the IKEA US website More details on the IKEA Deutschland page


5

Should they be stored with or without rims inside? I cannot say for sure whether storing tyres with or without the rims connected affects the lifespan. In my experience it hasn't made any noticeable difference. There are four practical reasons I can think of not to remove the tyres. It can take a lot of effort to remove tyres and put them back on again, ...


4

I was really stumped on this when I posted the question because there didn't seem to be any place to attach to. But then I realized the neck could be a starting place. I tried some things with hinges and plates, but decided to simplify and I ended up with: With only 4 pieces I was able to get this to work out pretty nicely. From neck to plate there are: ...


4

For any CMF's with skates, I put the figure on the stand with no footwear, and attach the footwear to the holes behind their legs. That way their accessories are there, and stuck to the figure, but the figure is on its stand!


4

You can use the Compare Sets function on Rebrickable for that (if the B model is an official model or a MOC on Rebrickable). Here an example for both official models from the 42069 set.


4

I've been parting out some of my old Technic sets for my son to play with, and I've found that tackle boxes work nicely for individual sets. It doesn't matter too much which brand you go with. Most of the major brands offer a variety of sizes. Here's a set I just parted out using a Plano 3700 series box: I also like the parts bins with removable internal ...


4

First of all, sort by form or size, not color. You can sort by color, but it is only suitable if you have large amount of exactly same part (no variations) and can keep them together or if they are all different in size but quite large. Otherwise, it will be a nightmare to search for that one small part in a stack of same colored elements. Although, I have ...


4

The most compact way would be to disassemble the set only partially, to eliminate all empty volume but keep the parts connected, as a bunch of loose parts take up more volume as the same parts assembled. Sure, that way you will either miss out on the whole building process of will have to start by completely disassembling everything the next time. Or if you ...


3

Product description says: UV protection helps reduce fading on flooring, furniture, portraits, blinds and draperies Reduce, not eliminate, because such film cannot remove 100% of UV, and regular light can also participate in fading a bit. If you want to store them, not to display them, then box will do. One that isn't transparent. There are opinions ...


3

Avoid storing Lego bricks in your attic. The daily temperature range and extreme heat of summer can potentially damage the bricks. Remove all batteries from Lego electronics before medium or long term storage. Place all metal containing pieces and electronics in an airtight container (older metal axle wheels, etc) with a bag of desiccant. Desiccant is ...


3

I really expected someone with chemistry leanings to explain to us what was "migrating" out of the rubber with time or temperature, to make them "greasy"...much like cocoa butter will migrate outside of M&M's that have gotten too hot in their package. The question "chicks" linked to gives some good answers though, and it's encouraging that no one has ...


3

Props to jncraton's take on this. I have an alternative suggestion, that may work for smaller sets. While I don't have sisters to keep out, I do have a variety of small sets that I can't keep displayed. My method boils down to: I put each of these in a plastic ziplock bag of the appropriate size. I can write the set# on it in with a permanent marker ...


2

The tubes generally age very well and I have never experienced a problem with them (I have had several of these sets over the years). I would double check that the pump is working correctly and you have definitely not got a poor connection somewhere (a leak). Double check also for blockages in the hard plastic dark old grey connecting tubes that are ...


2

My approach on the cheap side. I use small transparent containers left from food for small items and transparent plastic bags. If container is full than this type goes to a bag. Put them all to big IKEA type containers. Sorted by type mostly (not color), about 20 types: 1) 1xX bricks 6 units high (normal) 2) 1xX bricks 2 units high (low) 3) 2xX bricks ...


2

I sort my bricks by type. Common bricks, plates like 2x3, 2x4 or 2x2x4,2x2x6 go in big IKEA boxes (800.892.39) and all other parts go in boxes with dividers (Lunar Box, not sure about the manufacturer). Body parts and accessories are stored in big IKEA boxes too.


2

The two solutions I've seen are to measure the size you want and visit places that sell a variety of storage bins so you can find one the right size. In Australia we have a variety of bins about the size of a milk crate or beer crate (about 12" by 9", from back in the day when those units were relevant). The modern plastic equivalents with solid walls and ...


2

Weighing the whole box might help if you just want to check if it's complete - unless you fear extra parts. If you want to weigh parts or group of parts, there are scales which have an "item" function - you weigh one, then set it as unit, and then you can use the scale to give a count of the parts on it rather than its total weigh. Precision is important, ...


2

Tackle boxes are very common for storing Lego, I use them myself. Unfortunately I've not found or seen a good way to count the pieces that are in them. The easy way is to take everything out of them, which I suspect is what you're trying to avoid. One trick with that is to get a piece of cardboard (or plywood) twice the size of the tackle box, cut a hole ...


2

When I was young my mother used the technique of cutting out the front and back and thus preserving the various ideas that the photographs of the set provided. She stuck the box bits into a large craft book and it was stored on the bookshelf; it was handy to get to and flip through. Don't do this; don't go cutting the front and the back off. Whilst most ...


2

Having them connected may actually increase longevity, at least for parts of the brick. This shields out light and air pollution. I have several LEGO bricks that were connected for 30+ years, and the sides exposed to air (and Los Angeles air pollution) were significantly more yellowed than the sides that were connected.


2

Taking a recommendation from our friends over on Photography there are a couple of options available to you: The best and most common form of protection from fading would be the selection of UV glass or acrylic. Any framing store will have these options available at multiple price points with trade offs such as glare or less glare, scratch resistant or ...


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