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20

I have to disagree somewhat with the other answer in that I do not think it is quite as cut and dried as a simple "no". There are several factors to consider: How old is the glass in the windows in the room? Older glass tends to be less effective at UV diffusion/blocking though really if the glass has been made in the last 50-70 years it's probably fairly ...


14

This may sound odd, have you considered using an upside-down fish tank? I've actually seen this used in the past after the former occupant died. It was only a smaller model on a baseplate, but the width of the glass for the tank managed to fit inbetween the studs on the baseplate and worked quite well. Granted, stacking them could produce an issue, and you ...


13

Think about what causes the stickers to deteriorate: Heat loosens the bonds in the glue, which results in stickers peeling. Exposure to natural light will cause the colours in the stickers to fade over time. Unlike LEGO bricks, stickers fade faster under natural light. With those points in mind, keep stickers in a cool, dry, place away from sunlight like ...


11

It appears from the photo that there may be some "blooming" where the axles have changed color? You say you rinsed them, but I wonder if you noticed whether the axles felt oily or sticky at all beforehand? This would be consistent with the kind of deterioration that is common with Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), a kind of plastic that was once common in toy ...


10

While the LEGO plastic elements are very durable and should be considered as safe as long as they remain in their box, the boxes themselves are much more vulnerable. As you mention, direct sunlight may be damaging to the printing, but you'll also need to be wary of humidity and possible shocks. As a minimum, I'd recommend storing them in another cardboard ...


10

I have some standard Red 2 x 4 Bricks that have been stuck together in the same configuration since the early '90s, I just separated one and tested it compared to another Red 2 x 4 Brick from the same era, (and probably the same basic building set), but stored loose, and I could not discern any real difference in clutch power. This is of course highly ...


10

These bins would work well. Others have mentioned children and these would work well especially for kids. (This one can be found on Amazon here.) Adults could use this kind also or go for an industrial looking version like this: (This one can be found here.)


8

My first LEGO set was a police station I think from 1976 where I was 2½ years old. This and many other bricks (have around 50-60kg) have been stored in cardboard boxes, in the attic for years and now my son and I are playing with them to great fun for the both of us. Some of the bricks have some wear and tear, but overall the majority is looking just as ...


8

Another option may to be store them inbetween the pages of a heavy book. This would have the advantage of keeping them flat, as well as cool and dry. The book would need to be kept dry as well, as if the pages got damp they could stick together and make it impossible to get the stickers out. The downside is that you'll need to remember which book it's in......


8

I'm not sure exactly how many lights you are looking for, or the exact effect you are trying to create, but you may be able to get what you want using individual LEDs: These have a diameter of 5mm, so the nose is able to fit snugly into an antistud. I've used them successfully in Technic holes and Erling bricks. The main advantage here is that you can ...


7

Tom Alphin has a template of labels you can download and print with the appropriate label printer. Sample:


7

I can't speak to "best". But as a point of reference, many many of my lego tires are many years old and they are usually stored on rims. The older tires were often not removable from the rims. As I rarely build cars, I take no special care of the tires, and I've found that there doesn't seem to be any particular problems. The rubber ages over time, but this ...


7

Generally yes, as long as: there are no electronics inside (like Power Functions, Mindstorms, etc.) the temperature stays below freezing you allow plenty of time in dry environment to thaw out No, if the temperature rides up and down and you want to keep the box and paper booklet intact - it will draw moisture with each thaw cycle. No if electronics, ...


7

Very specific to your region (and mine): The ALDI chain carries the following hobby sorting drawers from time to time (about once a year): They are very cheap, about 7 Euro for each type and they are VERY popular with AFOLs in Belgium and the Netherlands. Unfortunately it is hard to predict when ALDI offers these and they are often sold out immediately.


6

Just keep them away from children, and store them on the shelf. the boxes are very easy to dust off, and they will not be harmed form the dust. Also, do not put anything heavy on top of the LEGO boxes! I have had experience with this, and it leaves a crease in the box. Actually, you should not out ANYTHING on top of the box, unless it is another empty LEGO ...


6

That would not happen naturally. I have Technic (actually, Expert Builder, to give you an idea of how old they are) axles that are probably 25-30 years old and look like they were purchased yesterday. At times they have been stored in a hot, humid attic in New York City, reaching temperatures over 120 degrees F. What maybe happened here is some oil or other ...


6

Try "Iris storage drawer" on amazon.co.uk. They sell transparent drawers and boxes in several sizes. These (3 large drawers or 6 small drawers) cost about 30 pounds. They are similar to the system that Jangbricks in his LEGO parts tour is showing.


5

Where do you live and how the bricks were stored? I see 2 hypothesises. Chemicals affecting the axle plastic. If they are made of a different recipe than the usual ABS, it could explain why only them were affected. On high enough temperature (in a car, on a summer sunny day would be enough to affect lego bricks). If the bricks were exposed to light. it ...


5

Technic axles aren't known to naturally deteriorate as described. The most probable cause for corrosion would be influenced by the way it's been stored. The bricks may have been subjected to a powerful chemical (perhaps used for cleaning?).


5

When I moved house, I just sealed the gaps in a bunch of packing boxes with duct/packing tape, and put the storage bins in there - that way if anything did escape from the bins it wasn't going to get lost from the box. I would say though that in general my collection wasn't organised in anyway, although there were a few built sets that survived fairly well.


5

You can try to use www.bricklabels.com It allows you to select which parts you want to print and allows you to print the labels in your custom size, fitting the drawers perfectly. Full disclosure: I made the app :-/, but it's free and open-source: https://github.com/Gottwik/legolabels


4

I searched around on dafont.com, fonts.com, and myfonts.com but didn't find anything. However, I found this post on the eurobricks.com forum from 2008, which links to this page: http://www.house42.com/2008/09/17/legorama-fontstruct-font/ This font (and its variants) are all available for download as TTFs (free account registration required): Legorama ...


4

Should they be stored with or without rims inside? I cannot say for sure whether storing tyres with or without the rims connected affects the lifespan. In my experience it hasn't made any noticeable difference. There are four practical reasons I can think of not to remove the tyres. It can take a lot of effort to remove tyres and put them back on again, ...


4

For any CMF's with skates, I put the figure on the stand with no footwear, and attach the footwear to the holes behind their legs. That way their accessories are there, and stuck to the figure, but the figure is on its stand!


4

I was really stumped on this when I posted the question because there didn't seem to be any place to attach to. But then I realized the neck could be a starting place. I tried some things with hinges and plates, but decided to simplify and I ended up with: With only 4 pieces I was able to get this to work out pretty nicely. From neck to plate there are: ...


4

You can use the Compare Sets function on Rebrickable for that (if the B model is an official model or a MOC on Rebrickable). Here an example for both official models from the 42069 set.


3

Do you remember having put oil or other kind of lubricant on the axes when you were a child? The "corrosion" seems to be in very localized parts of the axes, and oil can penetrate plastic easily (to make an idea: it's similar to the way hands cream penetrates into our hand's skin).


3

Well I used to keep mine as well. One thing I found very good was to take a razor or a box cutter and cut the front and backs off! this may seem obvious or defeat the purpose, but it made them easier to store. I would stack them all and slip them on a shelf or under my bed to keep them flat. This proved to be a very effective solution. Also, you could try to ...


3

There has been a staggering amount of different size and shape LEGO buckets, tubs and boxes. A lot of them are stackable with each other (meaning the same size and shape box produced at the same time can be stacked). I think narowing down the question would be helpful. Are you looking for LEGO boxes currently in production? Or all boxes LEGO ever produced? I ...


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