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12

I have some standard Red 2 x 4 Bricks that have been stuck together in the same configuration since the early '90s, I just separated one and tested it compared to another Red 2 x 4 Brick from the same era, (and probably the same basic building set), but stored loose, and I could not discern any real difference in clutch power. This is of course highly ...


10

These bins would work well. Others have mentioned children and these would work well especially for kids. (This one can be found on Amazon here.) Adults could use this kind also or go for an industrial looking version like this: (This one can be found here.)


10

While the LEGO plastic elements are very durable and should be considered as safe as long as they remain in their box, the boxes themselves are much more vulnerable. As you mention, direct sunlight may be damaging to the printing, but you'll also need to be wary of humidity and possible shocks. As a minimum, I'd recommend storing them in another cardboard ...


8

I'm not sure exactly how many lights you are looking for, or the exact effect you are trying to create, but you may be able to get what you want using individual LEDs: These have a diameter of 5mm, so the nose is able to fit snugly into an antistud. I've used them successfully in Technic holes and Erling bricks. The main advantage here is that you can ...


7

Tom Alphin has a template of labels you can download and print with the appropriate label printer. Sample:


7

I can't speak to "best". But as a point of reference, many many of my lego tires are many years old and they are usually stored on rims. The older tires were often not removable from the rims. As I rarely build cars, I take no special care of the tires, and I've found that there doesn't seem to be any particular problems. The rubber ages over time, but this ...


7

Generally yes, as long as: there are no electronics inside (like Power Functions, Mindstorms, etc.) the temperature stays below freezing you allow plenty of time in dry environment to thaw out No, if the temperature rides up and down and you want to keep the box and paper booklet intact - it will draw moisture with each thaw cycle. No if electronics, ...


7

Very specific to your region (and mine): The ALDI chain carries the following hobby sorting drawers from time to time (about once a year): They are very cheap, about 7 Euro for each type and they are VERY popular with AFOLs in Belgium and the Netherlands. Unfortunately it is hard to predict when ALDI offers these and they are often sold out immediately.


6

Just keep them away from children, and store them on the shelf. the boxes are very easy to dust off, and they will not be harmed form the dust. Also, do not put anything heavy on top of the LEGO boxes! I have had experience with this, and it leaves a crease in the box. Actually, you should not out ANYTHING on top of the box, unless it is another empty LEGO ...


6

Try "Iris storage drawer" on amazon.co.uk. They sell transparent drawers and boxes in several sizes. These (3 large drawers or 6 small drawers) cost about 30 pounds. They are similar to the system that Jangbricks in his LEGO parts tour is showing.


5

You can try to use www.bricklabels.com It allows you to select which parts you want to print and allows you to print the labels in your custom size, fitting the drawers perfectly. Full disclosure: I made the app :-/, but it's free and open-source: https://github.com/Gottwik/legolabels


5

When I moved house, I just sealed the gaps in a bunch of packing boxes with duct/packing tape, and put the storage bins in there - that way if anything did escape from the bins it wasn't going to get lost from the box. I would say though that in general my collection wasn't organised in anyway, although there were a few built sets that survived fairly well.


4

Yes, but not very noticeably or quickly. Keeping bricks assembled will always create stress on the bricks, and will gradually warp the plastic. However, the rate at which clutch power is affected, and to what degree is unclear, and depends on other conditions. My most pronounced experience with this was a set (6085) that I purchased which had likely been ...


4

Should they be stored with or without rims inside? I cannot say for sure whether storing tyres with or without the rims connected affects the lifespan. In my experience it hasn't made any noticeable difference. There are four practical reasons I can think of not to remove the tyres. It can take a lot of effort to remove tyres and put them back on again, ...


4

For any CMF's with skates, I put the figure on the stand with no footwear, and attach the footwear to the holes behind their legs. That way their accessories are there, and stuck to the figure, but the figure is on its stand!


4

I was really stumped on this when I posted the question because there didn't seem to be any place to attach to. But then I realized the neck could be a starting place. I tried some things with hinges and plates, but decided to simplify and I ended up with: With only 4 pieces I was able to get this to work out pretty nicely. From neck to plate there are: ...


4

You can use the Compare Sets function on Rebrickable for that (if the B model is an official model or a MOC on Rebrickable). Here an example for both official models from the 42069 set.


3

The tubes generally age very well and I have never experienced a problem with them (I have had several of these sets over the years). I would double check that the pump is working correctly and you have definitely not got a poor connection somewhere (a leak). Double check also for blockages in the hard plastic dark old grey connecting tubes that are ...


3

Well I used to keep mine as well. One thing I found very good was to take a razor or a box cutter and cut the front and backs off! this may seem obvious or defeat the purpose, but it made them easier to store. I would stack them all and slip them on a shelf or under my bed to keep them flat. This proved to be a very effective solution. Also, you could try to ...


3

There has been a staggering amount of different size and shape LEGO buckets, tubs and boxes. A lot of them are stackable with each other (meaning the same size and shape box produced at the same time can be stacked). I think narowing down the question would be helpful. Are you looking for LEGO boxes currently in production? Or all boxes LEGO ever produced? I ...


3

It depends a great deal on your play style and just how much Lego you have, and on what other skills and equipment you have. Using official Lego containers is the most expensive and least flexible option, as they are not really in the storage business. The Technic Briefcase is a good start if you have Technic, but those get pricey if you want more than a ...


3

I once built a white piggybank that was standing in a room for several years, also with indirect sunlight. It was discolored to a yellowish color after a couple of years. As @Nathan said, white is more affected (at least more noticable) than other colors. The window in the room had UV filter (although maybe one of the first that came on the marked, so not ...


3

Avoid storing Lego bricks in your attic. The daily temperature range and extreme heat of summer can potentially damage the bricks. Remove all batteries from Lego electronics before medium or long term storage. Place all metal containing pieces and electronics in an airtight container (older metal axle wheels, etc) with a bag of desiccant. Desiccant is ...


3

I really expected someone with chemistry leanings to explain to us what was "migrating" out of the rubber with time or temperature, to make them "greasy"...much like cocoa butter will migrate outside of M&M's that have gotten too hot in their package. The question "chicks" linked to gives some good answers though, and it's encouraging that no one has ...


3

Product description says: UV protection helps reduce fading on flooring, furniture, portraits, blinds and draperies Reduce, not eliminate, because such film cannot remove 100% of UV, and regular light can also participate in fading a bit. If you want to store them, not to display them, then box will do. One that isn't transparent. There are opinions ...


2

I sort my bricks by type. Common bricks, plates like 2x3, 2x4 or 2x2x4,2x2x6 go in big IKEA boxes (800.892.39) and all other parts go in boxes with dividers (Lunar Box, not sure about the manufacturer). Body parts and accessories are stored in big IKEA boxes too.


2

Having them connected may actually increase longevity, at least for parts of the brick. This shields out light and air pollution. I have several LEGO bricks that were connected for 30+ years, and the sides exposed to air (and Los Angeles air pollution) were significantly more yellowed than the sides that were connected.


2

When I was young my mother used the technique of cutting out the front and back and thus preserving the various ideas that the photographs of the set provided. She stuck the box bits into a large craft book and it was stored on the bookshelf; it was handy to get to and flip through. Don't do this; don't go cutting the front and the back off. Whilst most ...


2

The two solutions I've seen are to measure the size you want and visit places that sell a variety of storage bins so you can find one the right size. In Australia we have a variety of bins about the size of a milk crate or beer crate (about 12" by 9", from back in the day when those units were relevant). The modern plastic equivalents with solid walls and ...


2

Weighing the whole box might help if you just want to check if it's complete - unless you fear extra parts. If you want to weigh parts or group of parts, there are scales which have an "item" function - you weigh one, then set it as unit, and then you can use the scale to give a count of the parts on it rather than its total weigh. Precision is important, ...


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