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8

This picture might explain the reason: As you can see, arches form a nice circle to fit round modified plate. All fits well, except the very bottom. Making the bottom edge fit the plate/tile nicely would result in gap with a round piece. The curve of this arch brick isn't full 1/4 circle to make it flush with a tile/plate. However you may ask "Why didn't ...


7

This is a partial answer (or theory). The moulds for most of the basic bricks have been changed over the years to use less plastic while (hopefully) retaining clutch. 2 x N bricks were given thinner walls with 'notches' for the studs. This may have slightly weakened clutch power. 1 x N bricks (and some plates) were given holes through the bottom ...


5

I would assume that this is to do with stability and flexibility of the element, combined with the rectangular nature of the system. There are a number of uses of the part where it's not used to create a full circle, such as on the tailplane of 31011 or the fairing of a Ferarri and having a stud at the bottom allows them to secure the element on the top and ...


4

Finding a piece that completes a flawless circle can't be done with this element's current design, but... ...If we stick only with Part #2339, we can build an outside frame that changes the direction of the studs themselves in a way that produces the desired effect. You could try and contact LEGO customer service directly for their official reason as to ...


3

The largest truely round base plates in the LEGO system fit in a 8x8 square. You can build them from two LegoPlate, Round Half 4 x 8 or from four quarters. For a bigger (and thicker!) base plate there is a Duplo version of the above mentioned base plate, fitting into a 16x16 studs LEGO system square: LegoDuplo, Plate Round Corner 4 x 8 Double EDIT: For a ...


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