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19

It sounds like you're trying to implement a fairly simple bell mechanism such as this one: You can certainly do this using some string and the pulley element that you mentioned. I'd recommend tying the string to one of the holes in the pulley. Something like this worked reasonably well for me: Here it is in action: You'll likely want to do something to ...


6

You can attach couple of half bushes or full bushes on inner side of the axle near Technic beam like on the other side you have done with a gear. If axle is still trying to slide - fill in the entire inner axle part with bushes. Here is picture of suggested fix. Here you can see extra half bushes added to fix the axle the same way gear fix the other axle ...


5

There doesn't seem to be a difference in a shape of triangles (that's how they mention them in the video) seen in Dark Azure as well as Dark Blue colors. However there are two shapes - bigger and smaller triangles. Smaller triangle's edge is half the length of bigger one - you can attach two of these to bigger triangle. Larger one requires parts listed ...


4

It actually does take a Technic axle and has been used with such in some sets, although in most old sets I know it was usually supposed to be operated manually by rolling the drum with your fingers. If you look at the picture of the individual drum piece, you can just about see the axle holder inside, even though the round hole itself is bigger. So you can ...


2

Nice find. First of all, it is interesting to see the various techniques they use. The short answer to your question would be: It doesn't matter. Each gear, axle and all other components bend, stretch and absorb energy. This means that even for normal large LEGO Technic sets, such as the 42055, you have to build carefully and avoid too much pressure to ...


1

While only LEGO themselves can answer this question, there is a proposal for a 20 years of bionicle set on LEGO ideas that had achieved 10,000 votes and is currently under review. Depending on the outcome of the review process, it may become an officail LEGO set in a few month.


1

The slower a gear moves the less power (energy per unit time) is lost. So while each stage of the gearing does lose some power this is more than made up for by the gear ratio. There should still be plenty left to drive the final stage. A bigger problem is whether the mechanism will actually survive for 1093 years of continuous turning or whether a ...


1

If you want to stick to your current design (despite its obvious flaws), then here's another idea. Let's go! As you can see, I tried to rebuild the crucial part of your framework. Alright. Now two things I've noticed. You're using axles with stop. And there's some play between the bush and the wheel. Okay, firstly on axles with stop. Here's two pairs ...


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