24

No, it's not an acronym. The name 'LEGO' is an abbreviation of the two Danish words "leg godt", meaning "play well". All-caps is how the LEGO company asks to have their brand treated. Using the LEGO® brand ALWAYS write the LEGO brand name in capital letters. ALWAYS use a descriptive noun after the LEGO brand name, it must never appear on ...


19

The usual phrases I've seen include some mixture of the following: Universal interlocking bricks Modular building system Plastic construction toy blocks and so on... But don't forget adding "Compatible with leading brands" if it is indeed the case :)


17

The two biggest themes to be called "classic" are "classic space" and "classic castle" and refer to the period when these themes were first introduced. Brickset subthemes reflect this: Classic Castle covers the first yellow castle and accessories, from 1978 to 1983. I'd tend to include the new series from 1984 myself, since there wasn't much to speak of ...


15

Chapter 1, Page 4, The Unofficial LEGO Builder's Guide: The tube is the other half of the mechanism that helps bricks stick together. Tubes capture the studs so that you can join LEGO elements and know they won't fall apart.


14

The Travis Brick is the 1×1 brick with studs on four sides. The nickname arose amongst LEGO Space builders. It was nicknamed The Travis after talented Space builder Travis Kunce. He liked the part so much he had a tattoo of it. The brick is especially useful in SNOT techniques as it has studs on all but the bottom surface.


13

From the official EV3 FAQ: What does EV3 stand for? This is the third generation of the LEGO MINDSTORMS platform and the "EV" stands for evolution, hence EV3. The first two generations referred to here are LEGO MINDSTORMS RCX and NXT, respectively.


11

In this context, DTC means direct to consumer. These sets are typically only available directly from TLG either online or from LEGO retail stores. Here's the original source and discussion for the DTC set that you mentioned and several others: http://www.brickset.com/news/article/?ID=2900


11

Alexander O'Mara's answer is correct, however I'd like to add the reasoning behind LEGO's desire to impose such strict rules on their name's usage. According to the copyright laws generic terms can't be a protected trademark and thus if people start using "lego" as a term to describe any bricks-based game - they might loose the exclusivity to their brand. ...


10

The official story is that Ole Kirk Kristiansen didn't realise until years after naming the company what it meant in Latin (normally it's said to mean "I put together", not "I collect"), and as there was no construction over the products made in the first many years, it seems unlikely that he should have thought along those lines.


10

Quick answer: LEGO gear module is 1 (metric). See Section 3.4 at this link: http://bdml.stanford.edu/Main/CrawlerNotes The consensus seems to be the following: Lego gears have a metric module of 1, which is the same as a pitch of 25.4 teeth per inch of diameter. Pressure angle is likely to be about 20 degrees. (This is the most common angle with modern ...


10

A cheese slope resembles a chunk of cheese from a cheese wheel. They happen to also be the perfect size for minifigures to interact with: ‘Lego Cheese Farm’ by AIatariel, http://www.flickr.com/photos/alatariel1181/10582728886/


10

For an official position, you may want to check older LEGO catalogues or instructions to see if they're naming things, and how. While you can find some names for complete elements in, for example, service parts catalogues, I don't think you'll find much for specific subparts. Given the 1958 patent illustration, it's likely the patent itself named subparts, ...


8

Bricklink (at the time of writing) has 5 catalog items using the term 'stud receptacle'.


8

When looking at the inventory of one of the LEGO games (as if you were missing a part), you can see these are clearly labelled "MICRO FIGURE" On Bricklink they are known as 'Microfig', Lego Digital Designer refers to them as 'Micro Figure.


8

SPUA - Special Part Used Again, a part which is seemingly only for a particular set or theme, but is used again List of LEGO Abbreviations from Brickipeda


8

The answer can be closer than you think. Quoting from the Bricks help page: Bricks is a question and answer site for LEGO and building block enthusiasts.


8

It's "a campaign to help nurture the creative skills of the next generation", launched by LEGO on September 17, 2019. From the LEGO website: Today, the LEGO Group and musician Mark Ronson launch Rebuild The World, a campaign to help nurture the creative skills of the next generation. Over 100 children will meet Mark and other inspiring figures, such ...


7

The bumpy-things on the top of a brick are called studs. At the bottom of the brick, the holes that the studs go into are called tubes. As far as I know, there are no parts of a brick called nibbles or knobs.


7

Microfigures. Described by LEGO as "Microfigures...The Minifigures for Minifigures!" As far as useability go, it is true that within the Games theme they are only used as pawns/game pieces. However, in recent years, they've seen larger use. for example, in the 2012 Star Wars set "Palpatine's Arrest", it is used unprinted in pearl gold to represent a statue/...


7

As you say, the figures used in the LEGO Games are called Micro-figures - these appear to be based on LEGO Part 90398 - Minifig Trophy Statuette, while Marcus refers to them as "Tiny Figures" in his video, the press release that is talked about on most of the sites calls them "micro-figures" as well - I guess LEGO can't call them "Nano-Figures" as that would ...


7

I've heard variations on "Big Ugly Rock PieceS". However, I've also seen the term used to describe any large piece that the builder thinks has little reusable value due to its shape being pretty specific to a certain use. Obviously the mountain pieces are built to look like pieces of rock. But there's also some tower elements in the Harry Potter sets that ...


6

I suggest calling them "trophy figures". Here is my reasoning: First, we need to understand a key term: Microscale. In Lego terms, microscale means anything smaller than minifig scale. Here is the definition from the Lego MBA Designer Handbook: Kit 2 - Microbuild Designer: By that definition, both the traditional "microfig" found in the games and a few ...


6

LEGO and others sometimes calls those pieces a "bearing element". This term however is not limited to just that axle. LEGO's replacement parts service calls the holes they go into "HOLE Ø11" (possibly read "Hole Diameter 11"): The width of the axle is roughly equivalent to the width of a "bar", like the 30374 piece used for Lightsabers as such. None of ...


6

By considering a "somehow usual amongst fans" instead of "official" position (see my comment), I have heard some fans who simply "verbed" the acronym MOC, as in, "I MOC'ed for 3 hours straight yesterday". You could probably do the same with LEGO itself, but that would be frowned upon as LEGO is supposed to be used as an adjective and so on. (When I was a ...


5

I just use "Build". As in: "I'm going to go build" I'm unaware of any official term. Even "MOC" isn't official in any way other than just a term a lot of people use.


5

...actually it’s a highly sophisticated interlocking brick system source Lego Movie Quotes on WIkipedia


5

Terminology This is the most basic terminology in a single image: A bit more verbose version is found in this slideshow, but there are a few factual errors, highlighted in the comments below. The various parts are named based on their main characteristics, then their sizes in studs, as seen here: After getting the hang of it, it's time to advance to ...


4

As far as I can find, there are very few official "scale" terms used in LEGO. The term "Minifig-scale" is a fan term and is fairly loose, as the scale of the figs themselves don't really equate to reasonable human dimensions. Add to that the fact that minifig-scale vehicles and buildings have had variable relative sizes compared to minifigs, making it ...


4

Members of the French club FreeLUG refers to these as antistuds, and there is at least one LDraw part that uses that same naming. Considering a lot of other parts don't, however, it's probably not widely accepted. And it's not valid at Scrabble either. You could also use mortise by analogy with the woodworking assembly (a stud is also usually called tenon ...


4

LUGBULK does allow members to buy things at a reduced cost that is determined by LEGO's production pricing. I know our LUG allows each member to pick a certain number of elements that we want and then vote on the remainder. That way, everyone is guaranteed a certain amount pieces they want. Plus we can choose from the rest of the line-up also. But of ...


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