Hot answers tagged

20

If the helmet were jammed head-down, you can use a needle-nose pliers to grasp the edge of the tube in the inside of the racing helmet, as shown, and then pull them apart. You may need to twist them apart as you pull. In your case, since the helmet is jammed head-up, you need a way to push it out from the bottom. I suggest drilling a small hole through the ...


16

I have seen a number of very creative builds with the orange brick separator. Here are some examples: Spaceship by F@bz: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fabz71/12434428513/ Mech by Lewis Meeny: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tr0jinh0rse/11318913594/ Deep Sea Explorer by Keith Reed: http://www.flickr.com/photos/keithreed/12943153094/ And my favorite is this ...


14

How about a Minifig scale playground slide? There is a connection point for an Technic Axle connector to provide the support for the slide and two stud connections to add a ladder.


13

Push the Technic pin in a beam hole, then insert a rod (antenna or minifig tool handle) into the hole in the pin from the other side. The rod will prevent the "lips" of the pin from closing in, therefore preventing the pin from leaving the beam. Then you can pull on anything attached to the other end of the pin. This example below shows the removal of a pin ...


12

I found a few ways to convert a 3D model into a Lego sculpture. The first is a program called Dolphin Brickr. It works very well, as you can see in this image of Yoshi: The downside to this program is that it only runs on Macs, This runs on both Windows and Macs now and the output format is a series of images, one for each layer. So you can't import it into ...


11

Try using the orange brick separator upside down. This is a trick I learned from someone who professionally works with LEGO. The lower angle makes it easier to go under the lip of the tiles and it is much less damaging on the brick separator, as you are more pushing and sliding rather than digging and prying. To be clear, instead of holding the brick ...


9

I figured out a solution while waiting for answers. The tool I used for it was a universal T20 bit which most people have or can easily get access to. I took some documenting pictures of it which I would like to share here.


8

I have polished Lego to restore the shine. Bite marks cannot be removed, so don't bother. Most scratches can either be removed or made much less noticable. Be careful not to be too vigourous in your polishing as the sharp, crisp clean edges of a pristine brick can easily be rounded by an over-zealous polisher. I use a simple buffing wheel w/ a felt (or is it ...


8

It depends in what type of beams the pin are mounted. For studless Nicael's methode is the easiest. Otherwise you can use method 3 For studded beams you can use variation on this methode. take a axle of 6 or 8 long, 5 or 7 other beams and some plates. Stack the beam side by side and lock them together with the plates. Place the beam with the pin on top pin ...


8

Take your cross axle: And push it into the hole where your pin connector had stuck


8

To add to TheBrickBlogger's suggestions, F@bz has another spaceship that I believe is worth mentioning: https://www.flickr.com/photos/fabz71/21111423905/ I recall seeing an awesome dinosaur made almost entirely out of Brick Separators on Flickr a while back (and I believe it was called a Separatosaurus) but all my searches have been futile so far. That said,...


7

You can use Brickify for that. You just upload an STL file and it is converted to LEGO bricks. You don't need the 3D printing part and can go ahead to download the building instructions.


7

Whatever you do, don't put them in a bath along with small children. It could be that the bathplug gets lifted and then a piece gets sucked into the plug hole. With that piece blocking your ability to put the plug back in the hole, more pieces will be sucked in. Panic will ensue. Small pieces will be swept down the drain, large pieces will continue ...


7

One thing I've been using some of my brick separators for is in the construction of wedges for robotics and competition builds. The semi-sharp prying edge is sharper than most parts, and the angle is decent enough for a low wedge. They have no strong connectors of their own, but the height of the brick edge is 2 plates tall, meaning it will fit well between ...


6

This is a good idea for brick separators!


6

I haven't tried these myself, but in the computer repair world there exist tools with similar purposes. Spudger: Flat edge (the right-size comes to a flat point): Knife-shaped edge: Opening Pick/Guitar Pick: NOTE: A number of companies manufacture these, but you would need to make sure you get ones that are sharp-enough to catch the lip on the tile.


5

I once got myself into a situation much like this. What I did was unfold a paperclip and insert the end of it into one of the four corners of open space of the hole that one of the axles was in. Then, I pulled the part of the paper clip out in such a way as to make the most friction between the paper clip and the axle, causing the axle to slide out a bit. I ...


5

For difficult, stubborn dirt and er, stuff, in corners and hard to reach places, I use wooden tooth picks. They're also particularly good for getting dirt from between the letters of the Lego logo on studs. Also, cocktail sticks.


5

Short of damaging the parts (which oddTodd nicely documented, I'd tend to try to see if the part can't be removed by suction; although I'm not sure how you could generate enough. Trying to inject a fluid underneath (with sufficient pressure) might do the trick too; that's what doctors do when dealing with clogged ears (usually with a sort of big syringe). ...


5

Here is an alternative 'pin-pusher' that I put together using as few pieces as I could (except for a few tiles to make it a bit more intersting). The blue pin near the centre pushes pins out half way, just enough to remove the pins by hand and not to far for it to pop up out in the air. The two tan axles help to align the Technic beam you are using, I ...


5

Yes A hex key, being tough metal, is inherently a danger to ABS plastic. Using it to push axles and pop connections will eventually scratch and wear down your parts, something you don't want with technic pieces.


5

Since there doesn't seem to be a tool, I've written my own one. In case anyone else want to use it, check it out here: https://github.com/ChrZae/bricklink-xml-diff Take care tho, it can only really process the XML generated by Stud.io, the XML-format itself has more fields which I didn't care about (also no guarantees it will always work correctly).


5

Okay Bro, here we go. I still use LEGO Digital Designer. Open it, and you'll be using a combination of a few tools to filter out the exact piece locations in your model's 3 dimensional space. Below we'll use pictures of Bowser as an example for a few selections. The "Selection" tool sub tools: (1) Single Selection: Pick one piece you want to move. (2) ...


4

If you’re using regular bricks and plates, there is really no sure way to tightly lock them together. The only way to ensure secure assembly is to use special or Technic pieces. If you use special bricks with “knobs” separating each row or layer with two rows or layers of plates, you can then use plates across the knobs. A more secure assembly would be to ...


4

I have resorted to brute force in the past. By which I mean destructive removal of the pins. I use a Dremel tool with a 2mm drill bit or 3mm router bit to carve away at the pin until it disintegrates. The new style pins sell for about 0.3c each on Bricklink, so if you're assembling a model it makes sense to just buy a pile of new pins and and use those ...


4

Take a piece of hard sugar candy and screw a long thin screw into a small portion of it, small enough to fit in the garbage can without touching any of the sides. Wet the end of the candy to solve a bit of the sugar into a syrup and set it on the plastic helmet in the garbage can. Wait a day for it to dry, then pull the helmet out, and soak it in water to ...


4

I use them to get stubborn batteries out of remotes, to open stiff ports on device cases, and to get under tabs on soda cans....I want one on a keychain!


4

Actually, the brick separator is a very versatile tool for disassembling Technic. The end of the wedge can be slipped into the slot on the side of several pieces to help pop Technic pins out from behind (I also use it like a screwdriver for aligning Technic pins while building). It can also be used to separate stubborn beam connections. I've also got a 1:6 ...


3

Stick the pin end into a Technic hole (like in the middle of those two red bits), then stick a light saber rod into the pin, and pull the red bit. BOOM.


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