Hot answers tagged

15

According to data collected from Brickset, the total MSRP of all Star Wars sets to date is $18,933.76 USD. This includes a total of 508 sets. I simply used the CSV export feature on Brickset to put this together. Here's the raw data if you'd like to explore it further: https://gist.github.com/jncraton/68beb88e6027d9321373


12

You probably came across BrickLink. They sell pretty much anything LEGO related, including original boxes and instruction books.


8

A good part of the LEGO experience is building the set. There is little joy in buying a LEGO set that was already built by someone else. So you are right, that a disassembled set is usually viewed as more valuable. However, consider the following points. When people purchase a LEGO set, either new or used, they expect the parts to be sorted in some way into ...


8

Banknotes and coins tend to have very little physical value relative to their face value. LEGO bricks usually are valued more for their function rather than the material value. In most cases it would not be cost effective to buy LEGO bricks just for the material itself. Well treated bricks can be handed down, generation to generation. A 2x4 brick made 30 ...


8

Generally speaking, yes. But there are many factors that determine how a given set will be priced over the years. Sets that have rare, more sought after pieces tend to cost more (think monorails), so if you'd happen to have a MISB monorail set you'd be rich. On the other hand, TLG can inadvertently mess with any investment plan by launching sets with similar ...


8

The less sets there are available, the better the chances of a rising price. This implies the sets that will get more expensive with time are: Sets that are or very close to being out of production Sets that are expensive when they come out (> less sales) Very large sets (expensive > less sales) Licensed sets like Harry Potter or Star Wars (short production-...


7

Not sure about several years, but Brickpicker covers one full year. Here are the stats for the Green Grocer, for example: Or the ones for the UCS Millenium Falcon: And so on, you get the idea. They have more and other stats, too — e.g. the following quick overview for every set: They pull their data from eBay, through some third-...


7

If it's a newer set, missing instructions will usually just knock a few dollars off the price, even for larger sets. There are usually enough adult fans buying sets for parts that it's easy to pickup cheap instructions on Bricklink. For example, instructions for the new Millennium Falcon can be purchased for less than a dollar in new condition on Bricklink. ...


6

Let me add another perspective to TheBrickBlogger’s answer: when I buy a used set on EBay, I like to have some sort of a visual guarantee that the set is complete and as described. The only way to get that confirmation is by seeing pictures of the built set, ideally from all angles. So, when I sell used sets on EBay, I will make sure the set is fully built, ...


6

Colour seperation matters more in which audience will be interested (AFOL's knowing they used some colour(s) more than others vs. parents wanting a pile for their kids) than for price. Lots of things matter a lot more then the bricks being seperated by colour, some examples: Whether the bricks have play wear Whether the bricks have been miscoloured by ...


6

This isn't an easy one: collections can vary considerably in value according to the rarity and desirability of their component parts. There are several approaches you can take to valuing a collection, but it really depends on how much work you're prepared to put in. Of course, the only true indicator of anything is the amount that someone is prepared to pay ...


5

I'm not familiar with any tools that do this with eBay or Bricklink price histories. I'm pretty sure that Bricklink removes all data older than 6 months, so if this information is available, it would have to come from a third party who scraped it from the site. I have used a tool called Tracktor to look at Amazon price histories for LEGO sets. Sadly, this ...


5

These typically go for several hundred USD at the low end, and can be up to several thousand for the rarer display figures. One way to get an idea of the current market price is to check out the items currently for sale on Bricklink. A search for 'display figure' in the gear category should give you a pretty good idea.


5

Given the quality of LEGO bricks, I would argue that an original box filled with the correct amount of the correct bricks from the same time period as the box is INDISTINGUISHABLE from an opened box containing the original bricks after use, and as such I would recommend you continue your effort. Just make sure that the bricks are indeed from the correct ...


5

You might consider donating them to your local library, or an after-school program. Kids love to flip through them!


3

Set 6755 is basically an older version of set 6764. There are several listings on that page missing all the minifigs - they seem to go for ~$40 (or at least those are the current asking prices).


3

The value of the set is indeed greater if it comes with instructions (and even greater when the set comes with a box, but the increase in value is not as big as with the instructions). Especially with older, desired sets, a lack of instructions is sometimes a sign of a BrickLinked set (a set built from a collection of pieces bought from BrickLink stores), ...


3

I live in the U.S. so I cannot comment on the German Lego market. That being said, the answer to your question must lie at least in part to the European market for CMFs and not in the inherent price of each mystery bag. What I mean is the price of a CMF in the U.S. has remained at a steady $3.00 since Series 3. While distributions within boxed sets have ...


3

While this may not help you ascertain the value of someone else's collection you intend to buy or make an offer on, I'll add this for others who may want to know what their own collection is worth - using the Peeron website (www.peeron.com), you can work out the RRP of your own collection. Simply enter the set numbers into their database and Peeron will ...


2

I have been making a list of these over the past few months. I have about 43 and I think that another 50 or so exists. You can see the full list here. http://www.minifigpriceguide.com/MAXIFIGS.0.html I think that these figures generally go for between 400 - 1500 depending on the character. The last Spiderman Doc Ock combo that I saw went for around 3000.


2

My answer to this kind of question is always "it's worth exactly as much as someone is willing to give you for it." That said, one could look up prices on BrickLink (assuming there are any for sale there) and go from there. Failing that, put them on eBay with a reserve/starting bid of whatever minimum amount would make it ok for you to part with them.


2

BrickLink has a price guide that will give you both the current prices people are asking for sets as well as any details on those sets sold in the last six months. If you can't find your specific set, you may well be able to find a similar one (either in the same theme or similarly sized) that does have the data you want. Typically "new" or "new in box" ...


2

These displays are indeed rare, because LEGO demands that retailers destroy them after use, and most of them oblige. The sets inside are unfortunately glued together, so they don't have much value. They are valuable to collectors of displays, but that is a fairly limited audience.


2

Annual inflation in Euro zone has been -1-4 % the latest decade. Meanwhile EUR/USD exchange rate has been non-volatile. So that wouldn't account for much. If you've witnessed a price increase my guess it's probably down to greater demand for CMFs, allowing Lego to raise prices.


2

I feel it necessary to point out that I think the durability of LEGO is a bit romanticized. When coming out of my dark ages, there was very little I could do with my old LEGO, the pieces were scratched, had teeth marks, were yellowed... I haven't thrown this LEGO away, but it's stored and not used, hence not in circulation and hence has no economic value. I ...


2

If I were you, I would start by looking at the price the full set is selling because I have been surprised recently to see box I was expecting to be vintage treasures selling at very reasonable prices...


1

I would suggest going to Bricklink and entering the set numbers in. You will find the information on the sets you have and, if it isn't extremely rare, a price guide with information on how much the set has sold for in the past and how much it's currently selling for. Bricklink: https://www.bricklink.com/v2/main.page There is a lot of information on ...


1

They are listed on bricklink, they seem to be sold from time to time. I estimate for about 30 cent each on average... https://www.bricklink.com/catalogList.asp?pg=1&catString=462&catType=B&v=1


1

If the set was truly exclusive, the price is subjective. Chrome-colored stormtrooper minifigures were given out at toys-r-us exclusively for a month or so, and depending on the buyer and seller, the transactions can constitute a trade, a dollar, or anywhere up to 30$. I would suggest taking the advice of PsyLawn and getting it out onto the market if you ...


1

For something like this, there will not be a standard price. Really, it would depend more on the number of people looking for this. Post it on ebay, see what you can get.


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