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3

I would suggest looking at a speed build of this model and comparing the placement of pieces with that of your own. So, let's try...this guy's video => The Austrian Lego Fan seems to have banged out a step by step build of this model, which shows a many angles of the area you're have issues with. To get those butt-dragging results, you may have got your ...


4

I'll address some points from Zhaph - Ben Duguid's answer: While you could indeed manage the project with a tool like GitHub (using the Issues feature), you might be better off initially managing the tasks through a tool like Trello which allows you to create tasks and move them through various status (i.e. Planned, In Progress, Review, Complete) in a ...


6

While you could indeed manage the project with a tool like GitHub (using the Issues feature), you might be better off initially managing the tasks through a tool like Trello which allows you to create tasks and move them through various status (i.e. Planned, In Progress, Review, Complete) in a fairly simple, intuitive user interface. An issue with managing ...


2

Is the reasoning wrong? Most probably it is not wrong, but its effect is small enough to be negligible (at least compared to other factors, like ensuring an error-free building experience). In serious engineering applications this effect would certainly have to be taken into account. why are the Lego designers seemingly not aware of this and haven't they ...


3

The .UF2 file format appears to be a fairly compact, binary format for reliably transferring data to "microcontrollers" (i.e. small embedded systems such as the EV3 controller), and is the format used by the Microsoft MakeCode application, recommended as part of the First LEGO League. The .ev3 file is actually a zip file containing a number of additional ...


12

It's to make them fit with the original Technic bricks which have an even number of studs and the holes go in-between.


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