53

Various people have done this - however most of the links seem to point to a [then defunct] blog by Martin Howard (Randomwraith) from 2004. A more recent, and available, post on this, using newer pieces can be seen here: LEGO Logic by Keshav Saharia Based on a lack of gears and rack and pinion elements, Keshav decided to rebuild the logic gates using an ...


14

YES! Philippe Hurbain (Philo) has put together a great and very detailed write-up on those and many other LEGO 9V electric motors. You can find it here: LEGO 9V Technic Motors compared characteristics Your current draw for that specific motor @ 9V is: No load: 65mA Loaded (3.6 N.cm): 310mA Loaded (6.0 N.cm): 480mA Stalled (11 N....


13

This is a big question, but here are some of the basics: The original 4.5V system worked with 3 x 1.5V C cells. It was produced between 1966 an 1986 and was used to power motors and lights in a wide variety of trains, technic, basic and even DUPLO sets. Coexisting with this system, a 12V standard for LEGO Trains was introduced in 1969 and produced until ...


13

There's a YouTube video which explains how you can replace the battery in that light brick. You can also find the owner's explanation on the Eurobricks forums. Quoting from that site: What you'll need: ExoForce Light brick (obviously) A small screwdriver (or other item with a long, thin shaft) (my s'driver was 2mm (0.07 inches) thick) A ...


11

Yes, you can use another transformer, even if it's not recommended by LEGO and you do so at your own risk (which should be minimal if you pay attention to what you do). The plug polarity is + in the center and - on the outside; it should be mentioned on the battery and the real transformer (I wish I could find the one I have to check), and the size is a ...


10

Yes, you can buy all the electronic parts by themselves, but given that the electronic parts are the bulk of the cost, you may not save much. The MINDSTORMS EV3 set (MSRP $349.99 USD) contains: 1 - EV3 Intelligent Brick (MSRP $189.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Color Sensor (MSRP $39.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Infrared Sensor (MSRP $29.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Touch Sensor (MSRP $19.99 USD) ...


9

NiMH batteries only provide 1.2V per cell whereas Alkaline batteries provide 1.5V (nominal values). This means that new/fully charged batteries will provide a total of 9V for Alkaline and 7.2V for NiMH. The EV3 is programmed to show low battery somewhere around 6.2V and turn itself off around 5.5V. There is no option a available to tell the EV3 the ...


9

This is an Electric, Wire 12V / 4.5V. They can be found here: Catalog: Parts - Electric, Wire & Connector Just find the right length.


8

I eventually made my design available for download over at Shapeways with a CC BY-NC-SA license (login is required in order to download the STL file). I tested it at my local maker space in PLA on a µDelta 3D printer. For the electrical contacts, I tried with pins scavenged from a DIP IC socket like Cyril suggested but the pins were a bit fickle and easily ...


8

The short answer is about 150mA. Electrical Characteristics From the limited testing that I've done, the component you pointed out appears to be a positive temperature coefficient thermistor. Here's how Wikipedia describes their use as current limiters: When first connected to a voltage source, a large current corresponding to the low, cold, ...


8

I'd be tempted to use the Batmobile (76112) design: Basically, you have independent motors for the left and right wheels. This allows you to steer quickly and easily without the fuss of a traditional steering system. The Batmobile is $100 MSRP, and can be found on sale. The included motor controller is Bluetooth based, and can be remote controlled via a ...


7

The LEGO Power Functions connectors have 4 standard designations regardless of the usage: 9V power "0V" Ground C1 "control 1" C2 "control 2" It seems for motors that the 9V and Ground are unused. The C1 and C2 are used in combination to pick the motor direction. If C1 is providing power and C2 is providing ground then the motor goes forward. If C2 is ...


7

Taken from the additional notes of this bricks Bricklink catalogue entry. This item takes one CR927 3V Lithium battery. A very tiny flat screwdriver is needed to push the little clips to open up the assembly. I occasionally use the minifig-scale Axe, Crowbar or Screwdriver to pry plates, tiles and other bricks. If you don't have a screwdriver ...


6

I make a print (with silicon) of the Lego PF socket, in 2 halves. I just need the C1 and C2 electrical contacts, so I'm just dealing with them, but you can go for the 4 contacts. So in the bottom half, I insert two small pins from a DIP socket (for integrated circuits) in 2 tiny cuts I do with a kind of bistoury and insert the 2 pins in those two slots. ...


6

Sounds like this: Which can be found in set 8364 only. It's recharged by pushing the car on a charging track piece, itself powered by batteries: . Not particularly good, but the sheer number of track parts in the set makes it interesting to buy for some people.


5

Not directly an answer, but I thought that people interested in this question would also be interested in an inspirational post... I've seen a binary calculator like this live and have since then thought on building it with lego. Ah, sweet plans...


5

Credit where it’s due, Keshav Saharia’s gates were an attempt to simplify those found here: http://www.randomwraith.com/logic.html If you look carefully Keshav's gates you'll see that they suffer from a fundamental flaw in that they can't be reset, the input rods are completely decoupled so pulling them out does nothing. RW


5

There is a fairly easy and cheap way to do this since you don't want real variable speed control. As you noted, connecting the AAA battery box directly to the PF train motor technically works, but the motor runs too fast. The default AAA battery box provides 9v from 6 AAA cells. Lowering this voltage will lower the speed of your motor. If you'd like to get ...


5

If I were you, I'd try to use a car chassis as simple as possible. This would achieve multiple goals: By using a vehicle with the least amount of complexity you can keep the price low. By avoiding unnecessary parts the students' attention will not be drawn from the topic at hand, e.g. they will be more inclined to listen and cooperate if they are not ...


5

Cost. If you look at any set with electric motors, etc. you will see a significant increase in the price of these sets. They have marketing research groups and accountants that somewhat dictate the price range of the sets they release. Any engineer with good experience can tell you of the headaches of dealing with keeping production cost down. Since the ...


4

LEGO train motors get powered using a 9V cable. Philo (who also visits this site) has an excellent site with all the features and characteristics about the PowerFunctions motor system, which includes trains. This site is located at http://philohome.com/tech.htm. The speed of the train is regulated using PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) on the inside two wires (...


4

This is a Duplo Sound Effects Brick 2 x 4 with Water and Pump Sounds (Set 5605) brick from 2008. It featured only in 1 set, 5605 Tanker Truck.


4

The best solution is to create custom LEGO-compatible bricks that your servos (or other parts) fit into. This can be done by: modding existing bricks with knives, glue and other tools building bricks from other material (wooden LEGO, formed with Fimo/Sculpey...) building bricks with a 3D-printer (for instance see the LEGO category on thingiverse). There ...


4

There's this project, and with a mechanism like that you have a pretty high limit on the complexity of what you can do: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYi9sJkS19Q


4

As you have mentioned, there is BuWizz and SBrick which, while primarily are intended to work with smartphones, are said to be able to work with joysticks or gamepads, albeit possibly with bugs. I don't really see why would your age mean that you can't do modding, but assuming you have budget restrains or parents who would not allow it then these are valid ...


3

If anyone is interesting in whether the battery can be replaced, the answer's yes-ish. As you can see in the picture, it's powered by a CR2032. The only hurdle here is that it's welded to the contacts. Not insurmountable though. Also it was glued (or ultrasonically welded) shut, I had to put the orange part in a vise (with some cardboard to protect the ...


3

This is part # bb42 : Electric, Light & Sound Siren 4 x 2 x 4 Jack Stone and here you can hear the sound it is from Set 4621-1: Red Flash Station don't know if the battery is replaceable


3

My speed regulator is clearly labeled as being 9-12V AC. I have an official 12VAC transformer. I was curious about the internals of this device, so I opened it up: The circuit begins with 4 diodes in standard bridge rectifier configuration. This converts the AC input into a rippled DC voltage. The large capacitor (2200uF, 25V) then cleans up the ripples. ...


3

Power and Data The classic solution to this for model trains is Digital Command Control (DCC). Basically, when you provide power over the rails, you also include a data signal riding on top of it. Each locomotive or car with a remote controlled function needs an electrical connection to the track and a modest microprocessor to decode DCC instructions. You ...


3

No, the V2 receiver isn't available in any new products. It's only available in the sets you mentioned. The most likely reason it's not available in new products is that the production cost would be higher and hence also the set price which would make the sets less attractive for most lego customers. Also there is an issue with the V2 receivers when having ...


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