16

YES! Philippe Hurbain (Philo) has put together a great and very detailed write-up on those and many other LEGO 9V electric motors. You can find it here: LEGO 9V Technic Motors compared characteristics Your current draw for that specific motor @ 9V is: No load: 65mA Loaded (3.6 N.cm): 310mA Loaded (6.0 N.cm): 480mA Stalled (11 N....


12

Let's take a look. The first step to disassembling the motor is removing the small Philips screw on the bottom: Now there are a pair of gray tabs in the back white section that we need to release. I found it easiest to cut them down with a knife. Once those are free, the white section slides backwards away from the motor. Try to do this gently, as there are ...


12

I was curious about this, and TLG was willing to provide me with one of these motors, so I opened it up. I was able to get the outer shell off by cutting down the 4 tabs on the outside. This motor does not appear to be meant to be opened and put back together. These tabs hold it together very firmly and I wasn't able to move them out of the way without ...


11

The bulk of the space inside the Powered Up hub is consumed by the housing for the 6 AAA batteries. A small portion of the top of the hub contains the main printed circuit board. Here's how it looks removed from the hub: And here's another shot showing the back: The main chip is very similar to the one used in Boost. It uses an STM32F030 from ST ...


10

Yes, you can buy all the electronic parts by themselves, but given that the electronic parts are the bulk of the cost, you may not save much. The MINDSTORMS EV3 set (MSRP $349.99 USD) contains: 1 - EV3 Intelligent Brick (MSRP $189.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Color Sensor (MSRP $39.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Infrared Sensor (MSRP $29.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Touch Sensor (MSRP $19.99 USD) ...


10

This is an Electric, Wire 12V / 4.5V. They can be found here: Catalog: Parts - Electric, Wire & Connector Just find the right length.


9

NiMH batteries only provide 1.2V per cell whereas Alkaline batteries provide 1.5V (nominal values). This means that new/fully charged batteries will provide a total of 9V for Alkaline and 7.2V for NiMH. The EV3 is programmed to show low battery somewhere around 6.2V and turn itself off around 5.5V. There is no option a available to tell the EV3 the ...


9

The LEGO Power Functions connectors have 4 standard designations regardless of the usage: 9V power "0V" Ground C1 "control 1" C2 "control 2" It seems for motors that the 9V and Ground are unused. The C1 and C2 are used in combination to pick the motor direction. If C1 is providing power and C2 is providing ground then the motor goes forward. If C2 is ...


9

If we open the hub we can take a look at the main PCB inside. There's just one PCB in addition to a small speaker and the replaceable lithium ion battery. Here's the top of the PCB: And the bottom: We see that the main CPU is an STM32F413. It includes 1M of flash and 320k of RAM and the ARM Cortex M4 core can be clocked up to 100MHz. In addition to the 1M ...


8

I eventually made my design available for download over at Shapeways with a CC BY-NC-SA license (login is required in order to download the STL file). I tested it at my local maker space in PLA on a µDelta 3D printer. For the electrical contacts, I tried with pins scavenged from a DIP IC socket like Cyril suggested but the pins were a bit fickle and easily ...


8

The short answer is about 150mA. Electrical Characteristics From the limited testing that I've done, the component you pointed out appears to be a positive temperature coefficient thermistor. Here's how Wikipedia describes their use as current limiters: When first connected to a voltage source, a large current corresponding to the low, cold, ...


8

I'd be tempted to use the Batmobile (76112) design: Basically, you have independent motors for the left and right wheels. This allows you to steer quickly and easily without the fuss of a traditional steering system. The Batmobile is $100 MSRP, and can be found on sale. The included motor controller is Bluetooth based, and can be remote controlled via a ...


8

IR Transmitter Tower exist in both USB version as well as Serial cable version. Page 7 of instructions for one of the sets (3804) that was using USB version has following explanation: Transcription: The IR Tower establishes a wireless link between your computer and the RCX. With the IR Tower, programs can be downloaded from computer to RCX. These programs ...


8

Here is the schematic of an input port on the EV3 (available on official LEGO MINDSTORMS download page): And this is the implementation of the resistance() method from Pybricks MicroPython: STATIC mp_obj_t iodevices_AnalogSensor_resistance(mp_obj_t self_in) { iodevices_AnalogSensor_obj_t *self = MP_OBJ_TO_PTR(self_in); int32_t voltage; uint8_t ...


7

Here's what the main board in the Move Hub looks like from the top: And bottom: The Move Hub includes the following hardware: Motors The two built in motors are fairly standard DC motors. They include optics in the early stage of the gearing for rotation counting. There are two LB1836 motor drivers on the board. They are dual channel parts, so ...


7

They are protective locks. If something (let’s say kids hair, or part of their clothes) gets stuck and dragged inside the wheel, these tiny blocks will lock the wheels and make sure it doesn’t keep dragging whatever is stuck. As soon as you pull the stuck part back, the springs unlock.


7

I have also little soldering experience, but I managed to create custom extension cables: First: open the cover with a small screw driver: Remove the PCB by lifting the small notch to open the light block Then you drill a small hole into the opposite side of the metal plates, insert a small 2-wire cable (~0,25mm) and solder it to the PCB. The outer ring is ...


7

I don't have this part, so I can't directly give you the photos that you are looking for, but there is at least one teardown video floating around that we can use to see what is inside the BuWizz 2.0 module. Power The module contains 2x 850mAh LiPo batteries: PCB The top of the PCB looks something like this: I wasn't able to find an image showing the ...


6

I make a print (with silicon) of the Lego PF socket, in 2 halves. I just need the C1 and C2 electrical contacts, so I'm just dealing with them, but you can go for the 4 contacts. So in the bottom half, I insert two small pins from a DIP socket (for integrated circuits) in 2 tiny cuts I do with a kind of bistoury and insert the 2 pins in those two slots. ...


6

This is a Duplo Sound Effects Brick 2 x 4 with Water and Pump Sounds (Set 5605) brick from 2008. It featured only in 1 set, 5605 Tanker Truck.


6

There is a fairly easy and cheap way to do this since you don't want real variable speed control. As you noted, connecting the AAA battery box directly to the PF train motor technically works, but the motor runs too fast. The default AAA battery box provides 9v from 6 AAA cells. Lowering this voltage will lower the speed of your motor. If you'd like to get ...


6

It sounds like you are asking how to motorize your own custom LEGO creations using motors that you may already have around the house rather than purchasing official motors. Before I answer this, I just want to make sure that you are aware that you can purchase the PF motors individually on LEGO.com for fairly cheap. You don't have to buy large, expensive ...


6

The main functional difference between these is the electrical connector. The one with the red switch uses the old style 9V connection, while the one with the orange switch uses the newer Power Functions connector. These are both the same voltage (9V), and you can mix the two systems using the Power Functions Extension Wire (8886). Here's an example ...


6

Cost. If you look at any set with electric motors, etc. you will see a significant increase in the price of these sets. They have marketing research groups and accountants that somewhat dictate the price range of the sets they release. Any engineer with good experience can tell you of the headaches of dealing with keeping production cost down. Since the ...


6

For the first switch I bent the legs of the button and splayed them out just a little bit. Next I stripped off the caps of two Dupont connectors, ran them through the headlight bricks and connected the button upside down. An axle will trigger the button. Either one with a stud on one end (and a 1x1 tile) or a regular one with a half bush. A 2x2 brick on ...


5

This is a Spybotics Module from set 3809-1 Technojaw T55.


5

This part is called Micro Scout with Dark Gray Base the white version on your photo comes from 9748-1: Droid Developer Kit (pictures via Bricklink)


5

Skip on over to YouTube and watch this guy fix one of his toddler's jammed up trains. Comparing your picture to his video, we can see the general area where the "hip springs" should be, but from my vantage point I can't tell if the pieces snap in somehow, or if they were broken off during disassembly. That's where you'll have to step in to make ...


5

According to bricklink, 88003 is the set containing exactly one part, namely the 99499 motor. You can buy the motor as a set in LEGO shops or online, it's packaged in a plastic bag, which probably accounts for the 3 gram weight difference between the items. To my knowledge there are no different versions of the Power Functions L motor. Here is the list of ...


5

Boost and the other Powered Up components (the new City trains, the app-controlled batmobile, and WeDo 2.0) are controlled via Bluetooth. Any environment that can send bluetooth commands can be used to control these components. There is a github page which documents some of the reverse-engineering that has been done and it links to several third-party Boost/...


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