21

You're probably the only one who can answer that question, but here are a few thoughts anyway. If you're interested in mechanic complexity and how machines work, Technic is indeed a good way to go. And as you hint, it can evolve into robotics, whether with a NXT or with anything else you fancy. If you're after building complexity, I wouldn't recommend the ...


15

YES! Philippe Hurbain (Philo) has put together a great and very detailed write-up on those and many other LEGO 9V electric motors. You can find it here: LEGO 9V Technic Motors compared characteristics Your current draw for that specific motor @ 9V is: No load: 65mA Loaded (3.6 N.cm): 310mA Loaded (6.0 N.cm): 480mA Stalled (11 N....


14

There's a YouTube video which explains how you can replace the battery in that light brick. You can also find the owner's explanation on the Eurobricks forums. Quoting from that site: What you'll need: ExoForce Light brick (obviously) A small screwdriver (or other item with a long, thin shaft) (my s'driver was 2mm (0.07 inches) thick) A ...


13

This is a big question, but here are some of the basics: The original 4.5V system worked with 3 x 1.5V C cells. It was produced between 1966 an 1986 and was used to power motors and lights in a wide variety of trains, technic, basic and even DUPLO sets. Coexisting with this system, a 12V standard for LEGO Trains was introduced in 1969 and produced until ...


11

Yes, you can use another transformer, even if it's not recommended by LEGO and you do so at your own risk (which should be minimal if you pay attention to what you do). The plug polarity is + in the center and - on the outside; it should be mentioned on the battery and the real transformer (I wish I could find the one I have to check), and the size is a ...


11

It's an interesting question. As Joubarc stated there are multiple approaches here. But from my personal experience I would recommend a graduated approach into the Lego Technic. You should start with the sets on this page to see it you can find any kind of interest and to ensure you are not simply discouraged by the Lego Technic models. If you enjoyed the ...


10

Yes, you can buy all the electronic parts by themselves, but given that the electronic parts are the bulk of the cost, you may not save much. The MINDSTORMS EV3 set (MSRP $349.99 USD) contains: 1 - EV3 Intelligent Brick (MSRP $189.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Color Sensor (MSRP $39.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Infrared Sensor (MSRP $29.99 USD) 1 - EV3 Touch Sensor (MSRP $19.99 USD) ...


9

NiMH batteries only provide 1.2V per cell whereas Alkaline batteries provide 1.5V (nominal values). This means that new/fully charged batteries will provide a total of 9V for Alkaline and 7.2V for NiMH. The EV3 is programmed to show low battery somewhere around 6.2V and turn itself off around 5.5V. There is no option a available to tell the EV3 the ...


9

This is an Electric, Wire 12V / 4.5V. They can be found here: Catalog: Parts - Electric, Wire & Connector Just find the right length.


8

I eventually made my design available for download over at Shapeways with a CC BY-NC-SA license (login is required in order to download the STL file). I tested it at my local maker space in PLA on a µDelta 3D printer. For the electrical contacts, I tried with pins scavenged from a DIP IC socket like Cyril suggested but the pins were a bit fickle and easily ...


8

Architecture set - White House. This is the first lego I ever built (got as a gift from wife). Loved it. Right amount of pieces, right amount of time - ~3-4 hours. Enjoyable time well spent. Recently disassembled with help of a brick tool, packaged it up and sent it to my brother so he could enjoy as well - he was a lego kid, I missed out on that when ...


8

The LEGO Power Functions connectors have 4 standard designations regardless of the usage: 9V power "0V" Ground C1 "control 1" C2 "control 2" It seems for motors that the 9V and Ground are unused. The C1 and C2 are used in combination to pick the motor direction. If C1 is providing power and C2 is providing ground then the motor goes forward. If C2 is ...


8

The short answer is about 150mA. Electrical Characteristics From the limited testing that I've done, the component you pointed out appears to be a positive temperature coefficient thermistor. Here's how Wikipedia describes their use as current limiters: When first connected to a voltage source, a large current corresponding to the low, cold, ...


8

I'd be tempted to use the Batmobile (76112) design: Basically, you have independent motors for the left and right wheels. This allows you to steer quickly and easily without the fuss of a traditional steering system. The Batmobile is $100 MSRP, and can be found on sale. The included motor controller is Bluetooth based, and can be remote controlled via a ...


7

Taken from the additional notes of this bricks Bricklink catalogue entry. This item takes one CR927 3V Lithium battery. A very tiny flat screwdriver is needed to push the little clips to open up the assembly. I occasionally use the minifig-scale Axe, Crowbar or Screwdriver to pry plates, tiles and other bricks. If you don't have a screwdriver ...


6

Sounds like this: Which can be found in set 8364 only. It's recharged by pushing the car on a charging track piece, itself powered by batteries: . Not particularly good, but the sheer number of track parts in the set makes it interesting to buy for some people.


6

I make a print (with silicon) of the Lego PF socket, in 2 halves. I just need the C1 and C2 electrical contacts, so I'm just dealing with them, but you can go for the 4 contacts. So in the bottom half, I insert two small pins from a DIP socket (for integrated circuits) in 2 tiny cuts I do with a kind of bistoury and insert the 2 pins in those two slots. ...


6

It sounds like you are asking how to motorize your own custom LEGO creations using motors that you may already have around the house rather than purchasing official motors. Before I answer this, I just want to make sure that you are aware that you can purchase the PF motors individually on LEGO.com for fairly cheap. You don't have to buy large, expensive ...


6

There is a fairly easy and cheap way to do this since you don't want real variable speed control. As you noted, connecting the AAA battery box directly to the PF train motor technically works, but the motor runs too fast. The default AAA battery box provides 9v from 6 AAA cells. Lowering this voltage will lower the speed of your motor. If you'd like to get ...


6

The main functional difference between these is the electrical connector. The one with the red switch uses the old style 9V connection, while the one with the orange switch uses the newer Power Functions connector. These are both the same voltage (9V), and you can mix the two systems using the Power Functions Extension Wire (8886). Here's an example ...


6

Cost. If you look at any set with electric motors, etc. you will see a significant increase in the price of these sets. They have marketing research groups and accountants that somewhat dictate the price range of the sets they release. Any engineer with good experience can tell you of the headaches of dealing with keeping production cost down. Since the ...


5

This part is called Micro Scout with Dark Gray Base the white version on your photo comes from 9748-1: Droid Developer Kit (pictures via Bricklink)


5

LEGO itself does not make specific firmware/software to support other devices other than the official NXT brick but... ...you can still use Arduino and Raspberry Pi (and more) with the NXT components including the NXT brick. Personally, I mix LEGO and electronics all the time. Arduino & Raspberry Pi are flexible development platforms and they can ...


5

Credit where it’s due, Keshav Saharia’s gates were an attempt to simplify those found here: http://www.randomwraith.com/logic.html If you look carefully Keshav's gates you'll see that they suffer from a fundamental flaw in that they can't be reset, the input rods are completely decoupled so pulling them out does nothing. RW


5

This is a Spybotics Module from set 3809-1 Technojaw T55.


5

According to bricklink, 88003 is the set containing exactly one part, namely the 99499 motor. You can buy the motor as a set in LEGO shops or online, it's packaged in a plastic bag, which probably accounts for the 3 gram weight difference between the items. To my knowledge there are no different versions of the Power Functions L motor. Here is the list of ...


5

Boost and the other Powered Up components (the new City trains, the app-controlled batmobile, and WeDo 2.0) are controlled via Bluetooth. Any environment that can send bluetooth commands can be used to control these components. There is a github page which documents some of the reverse-engineering that has been done and it links to several third-party Boost/...


5

If I were you, I'd try to use a car chassis as simple as possible. This would achieve multiple goals: By using a vehicle with the least amount of complexity you can keep the price low. By avoiding unnecessary parts the students' attention will not be drawn from the topic at hand, e.g. they will be more inclined to listen and cooperate if they are not ...


4

The best solution is to create custom LEGO-compatible bricks that your servos (or other parts) fit into. This can be done by: modding existing bricks with knives, glue and other tools building bricks from other material (wooden LEGO, formed with Fimo/Sculpey...) building bricks with a 3D-printer (for instance see the LEGO category on thingiverse). There ...


4

There's this project, and with a mechanism like that you have a pretty high limit on the complexity of what you can do: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYi9sJkS19Q


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