Hot answers tagged

20

Here are some disassembly pictures and tips. Tools needed: Either a precision flat-head or Philips screwdriver: There are two flat-head/Phillips hybrid screws that hold the the battery cover down. These two screws do not come completely out the battery cover. T9 Star Key: There are six T9 star screws. Four on the corners of the housing and two hidden ...


16

It's difficult to tell exactly what part this fragment came from, but it looks like it is part of a broken Technic gear or pulley. It looks like it probably came from 3736: Your fragment looks like it was probably once one half of the center axle hole of that part. In terms of repair, I suppose you could try to glue this back together, but given that the ...


13

LEGO is very good about replacing broken parts - for free even. Visit the web-site and look on the bottom of the page under Customer Service for a "broken or missing parts" link (I can't check at current locale). This is worth trying even if the set is old or you didn't acquire it brand new. LEGO doesn't usually care where you got the set; but if it's not ...


11

Well, I opened it up without much success, and took some pictures of the process: At first I tried pushing/prying the light grey tabs away from the dark gray "bottom", but those weren't budging So plan B: wedge it apart: It was opening, but I was also distorting the plastic in the process - perhaps if I had a hot air station or something, I could have of ...


10

This is a common issue with the older Lego 9V cables. Lots of sources, including myself, have experienced the same thing - this particular chemistry of insulation ages poorly, no matter how well it's stored. Cables made later, circa 2004-2006 don't seem to have this issue - the insulation is less rubbery and more plasticy, and is still shiny like new to this ...


8

Don't fix it I sympathize with the desire to fix it, but on closer consideration it doesn't seem easy or worth it. Getting the hand out would probably damage the arm even if you manage to do it. Replace it The entire torso is available for less than $1 on BrickLink. This is the easiest path forward. Some similar torsos are half as much if you don't ...


8

I've had this problem several times before. There are two general ways to solve this issue. Brute Force Needle Stick several needles into the arm area at an angle. Then simultaneously push down on all the other ends of the needles to unstick the needle Hot Paperclip This is excessive but effective. I wore gloves and used my kitchen stove to heat up a ...


8

One option might be to make yourself an ABS slurry by dissolving a sacrificial part of the desired color in Acetone: This should be able to bond chemically with the ABS parts for a strong connection, and you'll have extra plastic material to work with, so you should even be able to make it stronger than the original design by building up the area slightly ...


6

Your best bet would still be BrickLink. Many sellers there accept cash, checks or money orders, so you don't necessarily need paypal or a credit card. However if you would like to work on fixing the bite-marks on the head you pictured above, there are several things you can do: If the bite-marks are not too deep, you can sand down the area with very fine ...


6

Brasso (yes, the metal polish) works better than toothpaste in this case. It is a bit more grainy so works faster but doesn't damage the parts. It does take some work though that may or may not make sense depending on the rarity of the elements. And yes, with either toothpaste or Brasso, you actually have to vigorously rub the surface to buff it up. It ...


5

LEGO bricks are made from ABS. Therefore the most effective adhesive would be ABS cement from the hardware store that sells it for plumbing repairs. ABS cement in theory would chemicallyc weld the bricks back together.


5

I have been experimenting to find the answer to this question, and today I have finally found it. I stumbled across a youtube vid of a child explaining his method, and mine was built off of his. His idea is to take labels, cut them into tiny pieces that are stuck onto the arm at the point where it connects into the torso. This works, all too well. Here's ...


5

This part wasn't meant to be taken apart, but it is possible. Source with more text and images also this (very dark) video tutorial and another video tutorial


5

I was able to remove the screws properly with a Torx T9 screwdriver from our Duplo Train Push & Go Motor (28743).


4

You can replace the arm with a new one by carefully removing the old arm and snapping in a newer one. Please note that this should not be done too often, as the procedure will damage the connection and could even crack the torso. LEGO never attempted the arms to be replaceable. It is not like snapping and unsnapping bricks, however it can be done a couple ...


4

It's sometimes possible to build a jig out of other Lego blocks to hold the broken pieces firmly together to allow the glue to set and the result to be very good. I use my worst-condition bricks for jig building because they almost always get glue on them or some kind of damage. The location of the break on your hinge makes it a difficult fix, but you ...


4

It sounds like the firmware needs a factory reset. Try this: Remove the battery for 10 seconds and then put it back Hold the Center and Right buttons until "Updating..." pops up on the display Connect the EV3 brick to your PC using USB Update the firmware using "Tools" -> "Firmware Update" in the EV3 software


4

Try flashing the firmware. To get into firmware update mode, hold down the right button when turning the EV3 on. (You can also reset the EV3 without removing the battery by holding down the back and enter buttons for a few seconds.) You can find much more detailed information on here.


4

Since creases in cardboard are not mere folds but instead constitute real damage to the box, I don't think you can undo a crease to make it look new again. Even "sort of" straightening it out will not do much good for a box - the damage (compacted internal structure) will remain visible and the area will remain a weak spot for further damage to develop. ...


4

You don't need to open the motor to get the lubricant in. Electric motor oil is thin enough to work in if you hold the motor with the shaft uppermost and slowly rotate the shaft by hand while squirting a small amount down the shaft. Don't use a lot - try a small amount, and see how well it works. Add more if needed. (this one I found on Amazon)


4

The tiny screw method works. We dipped it in dish soap, made a tiny groove with a thumb tack and then threaded a very small screw. Used two pairs of plyers, one on the arm and one on the screw, and pulled the broken hand out with no issue.


4

During the 90's I was gifted older LEGO bricks from a friend of my parents that were about 30 years old. Many were discolored, warped and specifically the blue and gray pieces would break if flexed. 30 years forward and some of pieces from my 90's mix are discolored specifically gray, blue, white, yellow, brown. I think there is shelf life of about 30 ...


4

According to various sources, LEGO pneumatics is not designed to work above 3 (or maybe 4) bars of pressure, so your setup might have been damaged by the overpressure. If you can "press on the the pumps in certain ways" then I would recommend starting your investigation there. As to actually locating the cause of the leakage, I have five main methods in ...


3

These cracks will often get worse over time as the legs are removed and replaced, or simply from normal play. Even if they don't get worse, the legs probably already have low clutch power which may be causing the legs to simply fall off. Given that LEGO is still producing a Legolas minifig, they will almost certainly be happy to replace that torso for you. ...


3

Put a little clear nail polish or paint on the part that connects into the torso. Not too much, though, or the torso will crack


3

Unfortunately older stickers are difficult to remove and reapply because the sticky part of the paper tend to rip off and leave a residue on the LEGO element itself. But the fact of the matter is that applying that taking off and re-applying even a new sticker is a challenge and it will almost always be visibly damaged at least a little bit. Your best bet ...


3

It's not a particular rare part, easily replaced with bricklink for a couple of cents, so I wouldn't worry about damaging it. If it's bent it's damaged anyway. For standard lego made out of ABS the procedure is to submerge it in hot water (hot to the touch but not scalding or boiling) for about a minute and then straighten it with your fingers or pliers in ...


3

I extracted two broken hand stumps with a hot needle and replaced them with unbroken hands from less important or otherwise broken figures. Procedure: Position the figure's arm pointing straight out and remove accessories that might fall off. Hold sewing needle with pliers over stove until glowing hot. Plunge hot needle into hand stump at an angle. Quench ...


3

MindS1 is correct that in terms of electrical properties you don't need to be terribly picky. As you noted you will want multicore wire to allow for flexibility and prevent breakage. I'd also add that the standard 9V battery boxes are current limited, so in practice you can get away with 22 AWG or even 24 AWG wire. I'd encourage you to try out the wire in ...


3

Unfortunately after attacking this piece from every angle with some plastic opening tools, I'm quite certain there is no non-destructive way to open this piece. I tried slipping a spudger in every seam where the plastic joins and was unable to find anywhere I could get any leverage, or even push it in more than a few millimeters. Even the jaw piece is held ...


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