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14

It's difficult to tell exactly what part this fragment came from, but it looks like it is part of a broken Technic gear or pulley. It looks like it probably came from 3736: Your fragment looks like it was probably once one half of the center axle hole of that part. In terms of repair, I suppose you could try to glue this back together, but given that the ...


13

In the old days, minifigures had a dab of paint on the neck. I don't know if it was for this purpose but it would wear off over time. You can paint some nail polish or acrylic on the neck to strengthen that connection. Thin the acrylic (use water based) before applying.


13

LEGO is very good about replacing broken parts - for free even. Visit the web-site and look on the bottom of the page under Customer Service for a "broken or missing parts" link (I can't check at current locale). This is worth trying even if the set is old or you didn't acquire it brand new. LEGO doesn't usually care where you got the set; but if it's not ...


12

There's a YouTube video which explains how you can replace the battery in that light brick. You can also find the owner's explanation on the Eurobricks forums. Quoting from that site: What you'll need: ExoForce Light brick (obviously) A small screwdriver (or other item with a long, thin shaft) (my s'driver was 2mm (0.07 inches) thick) A ...


12

Here are the two easiest options: Replace it. Contact LEGO, and tell them of your problem. I've hear many success stories from people who did this, and LEGO replacing it for free. For one person, it took a week to arrive, but for another, three days. Note that if you want to keep your old NXT, you'll have to have the receipt. If you don't have the receipt, ...


12

The material deformation you are seeing is called ‘plasticity’. It happens when a material under stress is deformed and doesn’t return to its original shape (this would be called elasticity). In many cases (and it is the case with LEGO ABS plastic), this deformation weakens the material (as mentioned by Kramii). To fix this part you have to deform it ...


10

one thing that worked for me is to use a very small needle-nose plier or a tweezer to hold the torso from inside while pushing the crack apart (very carefully). now you can use a toothpick or a needle get a bit of superglue in the crack to fix it. note that this just works for bigger cracks like the ones going up to the armpits.


10

Well, I opened it up without much success, and took some pictures of the process: At first I tried pushing/prying the light grey tabs away from the dark gray "bottom", but those weren't budging So plan B: wedge it apart: It was opening, but I was also distorting the plastic in the process - perhaps if I had a hot air station or something, I could have of ...


9

One of these? I regularly crushed these as a child. You could try inserting something small into the hole and gently easing it open. I've had modest success with a small screwdriver. Unfortunately, the gear will be weakened following a flattening. If it is badly squashed it is very likely break - either as you try to repair it or in use. Your best bet, ...


8

Don't fix it I sympathize with the desire to fix it, but on closer consideration it doesn't seem easy or worth it. Getting the hand out would probably damage the arm even if you manage to do it. Replace it The entire torso is available for less than $1 on BrickLink. This is the easiest path forward. Some similar torsos are half as much if you don't ...


7

I have had some success straightening bent train level crossing gate barriers by first immersing the pieces in a bowl of hot water*, for around 5 minutes to soften the plastic and then immediately trapping them between two hardback books and applying weights until they have cooled. So by using Joubarc's method to hold the axles straight combined with a pre-...


7

I'd suggest storing them straightened up for a while, if possible in 32 adjoining 1x2 bricks with cross hole, and add a few layers of bricks to hold them in place. At least it's a pure LEGO solution, but I'm not sure how efficient.


7

Taken from the additional notes of this bricks Bricklink catalogue entry. This item takes one CR927 3V Lithium battery. A very tiny flat screwdriver is needed to push the little clips to open up the assembly. I occasionally use the minifig-scale Axe, Crowbar or Screwdriver to pry plates, tiles and other bricks. If you don't have a screwdriver ...


7

Your best bet would still be BrickLink. Many sellers there accept cash, checks or money orders, so you don't necessarily need paypal or a credit card. However if you would like to work on fixing the bite-marks on the head you pictured above, there are several things you can do: If the bite-marks are not too deep, you can sand down the area with very fine ...


7

I've had this problem several times before. There are two general ways to solve this issue. Brute Force Needle Stick several needles into the arm area at an angle. Then simultaneously push down on all the other ends of the needles to unstick the needle Hot Paperclip This is excessive but effective. I wore gloves and used my kitchen stove to heat up a ...


6

If you are using NXT-G, the software that comes with the NXT set, then here is what you do: Get into NXT-G, start a new program. Select the tools option, and from the drop-down menu, select "Update NXT Firmware..." Plug your USB cable (one comes with the set) into your NXT. Don't try using bluetooth, as it won't work. Click the download button on the ...


6

I would try pulling off the legs and dropping a tiny, tiny amount of plastic glue on the hinge, smooth it out and let it dry, then put the leg back on. It should provide enough friction to the leg again so they aren't so loose.


6

To work properly, the Forward 5 block on the NXT as well as the Move block of NXT-G require that TWO motors be connected on ports B and C. That's probably the problem you see... To test a single motor, there is the motor block.


6

Brasso (yes, the metal polish) works better than toothpaste in this case. It is a bit more grainy so works faster but doesn't damage the parts. It does take some work though that may or may not make sense depending on the rarity of the elements. And yes, with either toothpaste or Brasso, you actually have to vigorously rub the surface to buff it up. It ...


5

The easiest solution, provided that motor is still in production, is to contact the LEGO customer service using the "broken part" button, or via telephone directly which might be easier for a part such as a motor. They'll usually provide a replacement without problem, but be advised that by opening the motor yourself, you probably voided any sort of ...


5

Maybe the plastic is worn off just enough that the switch is not pushing the pins completely anymore. Debug step 1: When the train pins are in the switch zone there shouldn't be a lot of space between the point of the pins and the face of the switch. If it looks too loose that could be the problem. A way to test this would be to put some clear scotch ...


5

You may want to contact the LEGO customer service which will usually provide a replacement motor free of charge.


5

LEGO bricks are made from ABS. Therefore the most effective adhesive would be ABS cement from the hardware store that sells it for plumbing repairs. ABS cement in theory would chemicallyc weld the bricks back together.


4

There is at least one possible way to hide the damage to a cracked torso and brace it at the same time. Wrapping the outside of a cracked minifig torso with a decal and/or a piece of transparent tape can increase the snugness of the pelvis/torso fit as well as reduce the rate of future cracking. There is a downside. If you do this without taking due care, ...


4

It seems encased. You can try to open it up, expect a short happened internally. Your best bet is to probably buy a new one. at 10$, it isn't so bad don`t you think?


4

Don't tell anyone, but I've used brushable superglue to put a thin layer on the back of the neck. Then I let it fully dry, and it grips the head fine. Eventually it will wear off. It's cheaper than nail polish and very hard to see.


4

I had this trouble when I was a nipper. My dad owned a model shop so I used the same glue that you use on Airfix type kits ("Polystyrene cement") - you can get this from model shops. Use a cocktail stick to smear a bit inside the figure, above where the top nobules of the legs will go so it won't interfere. Don't use too much because it kind of melts the ...


4

It's sometimes possible to build a jig out of other Lego blocks to hold the broken pieces firmly together to allow the glue to set and the result to be very good. I use my worst-condition bricks for jig building because they almost always get glue on them or some kind of damage. The location of the break on your hinge makes it a difficult fix, but you ...


4

Since creases in cardboard are not mere folds but instead constitute real damage to the box, I don't think you can undo a crease to make it look new again. Even "sort of" straightening it out will not do much good for a box - the damage (compacted internal structure) will remain visible and the area will remain a weak spot for further damage to develop. ...


4

This part wasn't meant to be taken apart, but it is possible. Source with more text and images also this (very dark) video tutorial and another video tutorial


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