A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
22

All new magnet sets introduced by LEGO will have the figures glued, as will any re-makes of existing sets. History In 2009 LEGO started producing sets of minifigures standing on magnetic bricks. At that time, the figures were removable, although some felt that they were of lower quality than the figs in regular LEGO sets. In early 2011, however, LEGO ...


20

When cleaning dust from scale models, sculptures, figurines or LEGO models I use an artist 'Fan' brush. This is the best method I've found to clean dust rapidly without damaging models. The fan brush's long hairs combined with the thin spread enables you to dust 'any shapes and surfaces without risk of damage. For example, it would clean a LEGO antenna (1 ...


16

Have you tried one of the smaller portable vacuum cleaners? I've had a few of the battery operated "Keyboard Cleaner" type of thing, which usually come with a brush nozzle and work quite well. Unlike firing compressed air and scattering dust/crumbs/contaminants everywhere, they are designed to catch most of it. Faster than doing it by hand with a tooth ...


16

The boiling temperature of water is 212 Fahrenheit (100 Celsius). The melting point of ABS plastic (the material LEGO is made of) is 176 Fahrenheit (80 Celsius). Therefore LEGO should NEVER be put in water that reaches boiling point or anywhere close to it. If you want to clean your LEGO, the best way is to just put it in a tub with luke-warm water and a ...


15

Brasso (yes, the metal polish) works wonders as far as removing print. Yes, you still have to rub it, but it won't damage or scratch the surface and it works fast. Just use a soft cloth, pour some Brasso on it and wipe away the print. Also, pure Eucalyptus Oil works really well. It requires a bit of soaking, but it will remove the print wonderfully and it ...


13

I have used the Retr0bright method with great success for restoring yellowed bricks. Originally, this solution was hit upon by fans of retro computers wanting to restore old yellowed computer and game consoles to their original color. LEGO fans picked up on it and have had good results. The solution is essentially hydrogen peroxide with sodium percarbonate ...


11

It appears from the photo that there may be some "blooming" where the axles have changed color? You say you rinsed them, but I wonder if you noticed whether the axles felt oily or sticky at all beforehand? This would be consistent with the kind of deterioration that is common with Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), a kind of plastic that was once common in toy ...


9

A very, very low-heat iron should be fine, although you will have to bear in mind that some of the sets of sails have stickers on. I would advise either going around the stickers (the heat could cause them to melt or peel off) or ironing the back of the sail. I guess the material for the sail is the same as the part from 6091 - King Leo's Castle - which has ...


9

I've successfully used a paint brush to clean my dust-covered MOCs.


9

Background info: I recently started collecting Duplo blocks to build toys for our sugar gliders (small, exotic marsupials); I've also got some regular Lego blocks in the mix that my boyfriend's had for who knows how long. To get the most for my money (especially when it comes to avoiding figurines and random pieces that don't suit my purpose), I've been ...


8

I have polished Lego to restore the shine. Bite marks cannot be removed, so don't bother. Most scratches can either be removed or made much less noticable. Be careful not to be too vigourous in your polishing as the sharp, crisp clean edges of a pristine brick can easily be rounded by an over-zealous polisher. I use a simple buffing wheel w/ a felt (or is it ...


8

Cleaning coins reduces their value because being metal they form a natural patina with age. The patina is an indication of the coin's age, and supports its authenticity. Removing any of the patina through cleaning reduces the value because it removes this sign of its authenticity. Cleaning LEGO pieces does not affect their value in the same way it does ...


8

First of all, sorry for your loss and we all wish you good luck recovering your bricks! As for cleaning LEGO bricks, if you need to remove physically visible dirt, here you can find lots of tips on doing just this, or you can go over to the official LEGO website and heed their recommendations. If the only problem is the smell of smoke, there is another ...


7

Whatever you do, don't put them in a bath along with small children. It could be that the bathplug gets lifted and then a piece gets sucked into the plug hole. With that piece blocking your ability to put the plug back in the hole, more pieces will be sucked in. Panic will ensue. Small pieces will be swept down the drain, large pieces will continue ...


7

A soft toothbrush can do a good job on an assembled model. Just make sure the bristles aren't too stiff. They could scratch the elements. It's still tedious, but easier than cotton swabs.


7

I went to Brickcon 2012. I asked Joe Meno about his red Monorail and he was most helpful. He flipped it over to expose the undercarridge and he was able to show me LEGO tires with fifteen hours of running time. The tread does indeed wear off and the tires actualy begin to split. The rubber doesn't cling to the rails themselves, but residue does begin to ...


6

Try the cyberputty gunk that picks up dust. it's basically silly putty but it does what it says it does. I use it for random things like this all the time. Radioshack has it for $1.99 last I saw.


6

That would not happen naturally. I have Technic (actually, Expert Builder, to give you an idea of how old they are) axles that are probably 25-30 years old and look like they were purchased yesterday. At times they have been stored in a hot, humid attic in New York City, reaching temperatures over 120 degrees F. What maybe happened here is some oil or other ...


6

I use pure Eucalyptus oil. It works wonderfully. Keep in mind that if you are using it on LEGO, it will also remove the original printing (but won't harm the plastic itself), so I wouldn't recommend it in that case. But other than that Eucalyptus oil can remove marker, paint, glue-residue, and all kinds of gunk much better and faster than products like Goo-...


6

Where I'm from it's called Plexiglas. Other tradenames are Crylux, Acrylite, Lucite or Perspex... Anyway, you can get sheets of it cut to size in D.I.Y-shops or hardware stores to build your own domes. If you are less handy, you can find lots of shops offering standard or custom solutions. If I google "plexiglas", I find dozens of solutions near where I live....


5

For difficult, stubborn dirt and er, stuff, in corners and hard to reach places, I use wooden tooth picks. They're also particularly good for getting dirt from between the letters of the Lego logo on studs. Also, cocktail sticks.


5

Where do you live and how the bricks were stored? I see 2 hypothesises. Chemicals affecting the axle plastic. If they are made of a different recipe than the usual ABS, it could explain why only them were affected. On high enough temperature (in a car, on a summer sunny day would be enough to affect lego bricks). If the bricks were exposed to light. it ...


5

Technic axles aren't known to naturally deteriorate as described. The most probable cause for corrosion would be influenced by the way it's been stored. The bricks may have been subjected to a powerful chemical (perhaps used for cleaning?).


5

Just put them in boiling hot water and leave them for 5 minutes then take them out, straiten the torso and it should come off. If it doesn't come off then get a knife and wobble it a bit and there will be no studs in the legs and you can take the whole body apart - I have successfully used this method.


5

You just can't. This part is fused together with sound-waves so it doesn't separate anymore. Source and more info: fusing Lego together


5

I can also suggest putting them in a solution of vinegar mixed with water. Its excellent at killing germs and cleaning the legos. See more on vinegar in cleaning here: http://www.versatilevinegar.org/usesandtips.html


5

Pure eucalyptus oil works excellent, won't damage your minifigs, (and it smells good too!). You can get it in small bottles at health-food stores, pharmacies, and Asian stores. You don't need much, so a small bottle can last you a long time. Just pour a little of the oil on a piece of cotton or soft towel, and rub over the printed area you want to remove. ...


4

Haven't tried this with Lego, but here are the first two things that come to mind. Novus plastic cleaners (they make 3 solutions for various scratch depths, with Lego I would probably buy the one for the finest scratches) work well on my pinball machine plastics. About the transparency, I would try the standard headlight cleaning solutions for a car.


4

You've got three different approaches: 1) products that fill the scratch, 2) products that essentially dissolve the plastic material so that it re-hardens smooth, 3) products that help you polish the scratch away. A silicon-based lens cleaner can do this and works for small scratches or some "cloudiness", but it won't be perfect. For example Bausch & ...


4

The retr0brite method only affects the surface of the brick and does not affect the clutch power. I have used the method on several printed bricks. I have noticed the black printing will start to fade if the bricks are left in the solution for a long time. I have not noticed that it affects other colors as much as black, but this may be because the fading ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible