16

Brasso (yes, the metal polish) works wonders as far as removing print. Yes, you still have to rub it, but it won't damage or scratch the surface and it works fast. Just use a soft cloth, pour some Brasso on it and wipe away the print. Also, pure Eucalyptus Oil works really well. It requires a bit of soaking, but it will remove the print wonderfully and it ...


16

The boiling temperature of water is 212 Fahrenheit (100 Celsius). The melting point of ABS plastic (the material LEGO is made of) is 176 Fahrenheit (80 Celsius). Therefore LEGO should NEVER be put in water that reaches boiling point or anywhere close to it. If you want to clean your LEGO, the best way is to just put it in a tub with luke-warm water and a ...


10

Background info: I recently started collecting Duplo blocks to build toys for our sugar gliders (small, exotic marsupials); I've also got some regular Lego blocks in the mix that my boyfriend's had for who knows how long. To get the most for my money (especially when it comes to avoiding figurines and random pieces that don't suit my purpose), I've been ...


8

Cleaning coins reduces their value because being metal they form a natural patina with age. The patina is an indication of the coin's age, and supports its authenticity. Removing any of the patina through cleaning reduces the value because it removes this sign of its authenticity. Cleaning LEGO pieces does not affect their value in the same way it does ...


8

I have polished Lego to restore the shine. Bite marks cannot be removed, so don't bother. Most scratches can either be removed or made much less noticable. Be careful not to be too vigourous in your polishing as the sharp, crisp clean edges of a pristine brick can easily be rounded by an over-zealous polisher. I use a simple buffing wheel w/ a felt (or is it ...


8

First of all, sorry for your loss and we all wish you good luck recovering your bricks! As for cleaning LEGO bricks, if you need to remove physically visible dirt, here you can find lots of tips on doing just this, or you can go over to the official LEGO website and heed their recommendations. If the only problem is the smell of smoke, there is another ...


7

I went to Brickcon 2012. I asked Joe Meno about his red Monorail and he was most helpful. He flipped it over to expose the undercarridge and he was able to show me LEGO tires with fifteen hours of running time. The tread does indeed wear off and the tires actualy begin to split. The rubber doesn't cling to the rails themselves, but residue does begin to ...


7

Whatever you do, don't put them in a bath along with small children. It could be that the bathplug gets lifted and then a piece gets sucked into the plug hole. With that piece blocking your ability to put the plug back in the hole, more pieces will be sucked in. Panic will ensue. Small pieces will be swept down the drain, large pieces will continue ...


6

I use pure Eucalyptus oil. It works wonderfully. Keep in mind that if you are using it on LEGO, it will also remove the original printing (but won't harm the plastic itself), so I wouldn't recommend it in that case. But other than that Eucalyptus oil can remove marker, paint, glue-residue, and all kinds of gunk much better and faster than products like Goo-...


6

Where I'm from it's called Plexiglas. Other tradenames are Crylux, Acrylite, Lucite or Perspex... Anyway, you can get sheets of it cut to size in D.I.Y-shops or hardware stores to build your own domes. If you are less handy, you can find lots of shops offering standard or custom solutions. If I google "plexiglas", I find dozens of solutions near where I live....


6

According to this page it is glued together and can not be opened without damaging the part You are correct about it containing a metal spring I would just wipe it with a slighty wet towel


5

For difficult, stubborn dirt and er, stuff, in corners and hard to reach places, I use wooden tooth picks. They're also particularly good for getting dirt from between the letters of the Lego logo on studs. Also, cocktail sticks.


5

Just put them in boiling hot water and leave them for 5 minutes then take them out, straiten the torso and it should come off. If it doesn't come off then get a knife and wobble it a bit and there will be no studs in the legs and you can take the whole body apart - I have successfully used this method.


5

I can also suggest putting them in a solution of vinegar mixed with water. Its excellent at killing germs and cleaning the legos. See more on vinegar in cleaning here: http://www.versatilevinegar.org/usesandtips.html


5

You just can't. This part is fused together with sound-waves so it doesn't separate anymore. Source and more info: fusing Lego together


5

Pure eucalyptus oil works excellent, won't damage your minifigs, (and it smells good too!). You can get it in small bottles at health-food stores, pharmacies, and Asian stores. You don't need much, so a small bottle can last you a long time. Just pour a little of the oil on a piece of cotton or soft towel, and rub over the printed area you want to remove. ...


4

I have found that laundry detergent with warm water works best. It's usually a stronger detergent than dishwashing liquid (which is commonly suggested). Either way, look for something that's as close to a pure detergent as possible - no scents, fabric softeners, dish-shiny-makers etc. I try to avoid anything that is known to change the bricks - peroxides are ...


4

You've got three different approaches: 1) products that fill the scratch, 2) products that essentially dissolve the plastic material so that it re-hardens smooth, 3) products that help you polish the scratch away. A silicon-based lens cleaner can do this and works for small scratches or some "cloudiness", but it won't be perfect. For example Bausch & ...


4

Haven't tried this with Lego, but here are the first two things that come to mind. Novus plastic cleaners (they make 3 solutions for various scratch depths, with Lego I would probably buy the one for the finest scratches) work well on my pinball machine plastics. About the transparency, I would try the standard headlight cleaning solutions for a car.


4

I have washed thousands of Lego and Duplo bricks in the washing machine as per the suggestion of Lego Store staff that have kid's events. The Lego stores use washing machines. None of by bricks have warped. I use warm water wash on gentle cycle, and I soak them by lifting up the lid. I add about a half cup of chlorine to a load to disinfect the bricks as I ...


4

The retr0brite method only affects the surface of the brick and does not affect the clutch power. I have used the method on several printed bricks. I have noticed the black printing will start to fade if the bricks are left in the solution for a long time. I have not noticed that it affects other colors as much as black, but this may be because the fading ...


4

In this discussion at LUGNET the conclusion seems to be that you could use dry graphite if you are comfortable with graphite powder everywhere. Else you should try lithium grease or canola oil. There is also a serious warning about using hydrocarbon oils that could damage the rubber seals inside pistons and the rubber air tubes. One poster also noted that ...


4

I've been to Legoland Windsor (in the UK) on one of the days they were cleaning some of the boats, and it looked hard - all manual work, with a large toothbrush and plenty of elbow grease


4

First off be very careful of the printing on the minifigure, the plastic is quite durable but the printing can wipe off rather easily. I list a few different methods to remove permanent marker all have their varying degrees of risk. They are listed in the order I'd try them in. Dry erase marker?! Just cover over the permanent marker with a dry erase marker ...


4

The official guidance from The LEGO group suggests using a mild detergent. Cleaning your LEGO® bricks is really easy! We recommend that you clean your LEGO® parts by hand using water no hotter than 104°F / 40°C and a soft cloth or sponge.** Higher temperatures may affect the quality of the parts. You can add a mild detergent to the water - please rinse them ...


3

Don't use the dishwasher. My husband misread washing machine and we put them in the dishwasher nearly half of them warped!


3

I would not recommend using a dishwasher. I have seen terribly worn bricks with a very ugly, dull surface as a result of multiple dishwasher procedures. Sometimes you can notice that a dishwasher etches even a glass surface. The damage could probably be caused by a combination of the water properties, detergent being used, and temperature.


3

I got good results using Soft Scrub with Bleach, an old towel, a Scotch-Brite scrubber sponge (the green and yellow one), a bottle brush, and a pile of Q-tips. Put a dollop of Soft Scrub on an old towel, dip the Lego piece in the cleanser, and rub 30-60 seconds on the scrubber side of the sponge. Check for results and keep rubbing until decoration is gone. ...


3

I tried Eucalyptus Oil a found on some figures it worked very slowly and took a lot of rubbing, while on other figures it worked on very quickly. I don't know what the difference in the figures paint/decal is or could be. I did find that Ethyl Alcohol (not Isopropyl, have not tested yet) worked fairly quickly with aggressive rubbing with a q-tip swab. I ...


3

In general, legos can be un-yellowed by soaking in a combination of hydrogen peroxide, oxyclean powder (or sodium percarbonate), under sunlight or UV light. Or use Retr0Bright. Certain colors of painted decorations (such as gold) will not hold up well to the cleaning, but plain pieces and some colors do hold up well.


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