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13

Some of it may be your own perception changing, such as a room you remember being big when you were a kid, but which you find small as an adult. So when you perceive bricks as being softer, it could actually be that they aren't, but that your perception changed. (If you were to walk barefoot on LEGO bricks for one hour per day, your feet would eventually ...


11

I can't definitively answer, but I can say that this has been a common observation around the late 1990's and early 2000's-- nothing to do with Chinese manufacturing. I personally made the observation when comparing construction in large-scale creations in 1999/2000 and later in 2005. The large scale creation in 1999/2000 was a very large building, ...


11

These are instructions from "LEGO Books - Idea Book #1 or 221", that was released in 1973. YouTuber BrickTsar uploaded his entire childhood book HERE. Similar to the LEGO Idea books I had as a kid in the late 80's, these types of books were made with multiple sets in mind. So, there isn't a focus on one specific set. The focus was you nagging your ...


10

Those would be Waffle Bottoms, which seem to have been mostly phased out by 1969, except for the 4x8 plate that went until 1971. Having not read any deep history on old LEGO designs, I'm going with that was just what they went with to start, then realized that the tubes were much better.


10

This is a common issue with the older Lego 9V cables. Lots of sources, including myself, have experienced the same thing - this particular chemistry of insulation ages poorly, no matter how well it's stored. Cables made later, circa 2004-2006 don't seem to have this issue - the insulation is less rubbery and more plasticy, and is still shiny like new to this ...


9

That is a Kawada Dia Block made in Japan. Entex and Sears imported those into the US in the 70’s and 80’s and repackaged them under such brands as Loc Bloc and Brix Blox. The “S” is actually a K on top of a D, which is the emblem for the Japanese toy company Kawada. Dia Blocks are still made and available in Japan today.


9

Plastic pieces will become harder over time. Not sure why, but I think it is that the substance that were added to make the plastic a little softer evaporates over time. I have been told that the people designing sets for LEGO never use pieces older than 2 years. This is because harder pieces will have more clutch power than softer pieces and because of ...


9

It's a "Vehicle, Tipper End Flat with Pins". It was used in trains (but not only trains) a long time ago (1969-1982), and I actually have a couple from a train I owned as a kid.


9

This is Part# 824 : Train Base 4 x 7 with Wheels Holder It appears in 2 train sets from 1966


8

Every Lego wooden duck I have seen, whether in person or on the internet, is sitting on a platform with the wheels attached to the platform. This is the original version: Here is a later version: Are there any markings on the toy itself that lead you to believe it is a Lego product?


8

They're part of the 1972 train-sets 130, 171, 180, 181 and 724 (picture is set 130) Yellow version is part of the 1979 technic-set 856.


8

This is Vehicle, Tractor Chassis Base 11 x 2 x 3


7

I have solved the mystery. After searching up many different vintage plastic bricks (I had no idea there were so many), I stumbled upon LOC BLOC, made in the USA in the 1970's by a company called Entex. I still don't get what the "S" symbol on top of the brick is, but they match completely. http://www.architoys.net/toys/toypages/locblocs.html


7

Here you go: http://goichot.free.fr/lego/7822/8.JPG Have been looking myself for hours as I have two 7822 sets but no box...


7

It is one box from 364-1: Harbour Scene from 1975: Here's what the particular box looked like in newer condition: And here's the set freshly opened with your box slotted into its place. Your box is the top center one if you can't tell from the image. Here's a video covering this set in detail.


7

Your box is a 700/1 Swedish box (a 700/2 doesn't have that much blue space above and below the image). Value depends on what is inside as well: the bricks/windows/doors, as well as if the interior cardboard partitions are still there. Also, I know several collectors (with deep pockets) who would be interested if you still want to sell this set.


7

From a train point of view those wheels will fit happily within the guides of the bridge, and the connections on the tracks should just about fit as well. I'm fairly sure we bought our bridge when we were staying in a holiday cottage that had a load of the old black track, and it connected to the track successfully, but you may need to work with some curves ...


6

I just built the bridge yesterday. I didn't have all the parts so had to be creative at some points. I'll improve some joints once I picked up more of my Lego at my dads' place. Very funny project! Pictures:


6

For starters, having that as a production error is completely impossible, given the industrial precision of our beloved bricks. The LEGO group has been incredibly careful for decades about the tolerance of their bricks' dimensions: You can read this WIRED article where the author compares old and new bricks' dimensions (TL;DR: they have been making really ...


6

It's part 4869 - Engine, Smooth Large, Center.


6

As Syberion mentioned, Gary Isztok is the authority on old LEGO sets. Mursten (Bricks in most Scandinavian languages) is the old name for the LEGO line (after Automatic Binding Bricks but before LEGO System) at a time when the product wasn’t yet globally availaible. I would strongly recommend reaching out to him (he has a facebook page as well, look for the ...


5

They are rarer because fewer exists, they were made a long time ago, and LEGO has procuded many more elements since. They are treasured by some because some collectors value having accurate bricks in their old sets, because they get that bit more authentic. I only care when there's a more easily visible difference like a groove on 2x2 tiles, or open/closed ...


5

As I understand it, "Pat. Pend." bricks were made in the 1960's. Later around 1970 they removed "Pat. Pend." by carving it out of the molds, so there is a lump in place of it. These are sometimes called "Pat. Pend. removed". Those ran until 1976-ish? I don't think any of these bricks are much more valuable than the others. Old generic bricks aren't ...


5

Given the quality of LEGO bricks, I would argue that an original box filled with the correct amount of the correct bricks from the same time period as the box is INDISTINGUISHABLE from an opened box containing the original bricks after use, and as such I would recommend you continue your effort. Just make sure that the bricks are indeed from the correct ...


5

ATC is the Asahi Toy Company from Japan. Here are the pages from their 1971 catalog showing some of their construction sets:


5

The set(s) in question are likely two versions of set 1210 Small Store, released in 1955, or 210 Small Store, sold in 1958. They were available in a number of languages and with a variety of store names. "Tabak" means Tobacco in both Dutch and German. The Dutch word for bakery, however, is "bakkerij", while in German it is "Bäckerei". "Bakerei" is only used ...


4

Whilst there is quite a bit of clearance on the crane as it stands, the Container Ship (4030) was quite a high sided beast - although you can see that better on the catalogue page: I would think that a bit of extra height from the hinge would be useful to make it over the edges of the ship - assuming you haven't raised the crane's base. The alternative ...


4

If you're selling an old set, you naturally want it to be made of old bricks. How would you like to buy a 1960's set, paying a vintage price, only to find that its bricks are 2010 vintage? Such a set must be comprised of bricks of its era. That why pat-pend bricks are important.


4

I cannot tell by the injection markings but having been a lego collector since 1967 I can tell that they are around that era. They look like some of the original ABS plastic. I also have some even older lego bricks in my collection (circa 1960) and they are of a different plastic but you cannot see the molding points on those.


4

During the 90's I was gifted older LEGO bricks from a friend of my parents that were about 30 years old. Many were discolored, warped and specifically the blue and gray pieces would break if flexed. 30 years forward and some of pieces from my 90's mix are discolored specifically gray, blue, white, yellow, brown. I think there is shelf life of about 30 ...


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