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24

Added a Ver.2.Oh belowww... Here's the LDD file if you want it. Here's the file for 2nd helpings. Eat up!


22

I've come up with five different ways to make a micro security camera that look like your reference image. I'll run through the different methods in the image above from left to right 1 through 5. Far left camera 1 Tile, Round 1 x 1 in black (the lens), Brick, Round 1 x 1 Open Stud in white (camera body), Plate, Modified 1 x 1 Rounded with Handle in white ...


18

While there could be various approaches building studless the easiest one would be with Tile, Modified 2 x 2 Inverted. These modified tiles have studs on one side, which fit under bricks and plates, and smooth surface on the other side. Here is a prototype which features equal 6-stud (or 30 modules) long sides. Parts can be changed upon availability, but it ...


14

Hexagonal symmetry and angles in 15, 30 and 60-degree proportions are scarce among LEGO elements. I think the smallest single piece that approximates a six-pointed star is the basic flower: I myself don't practice freelance brick modification, but someone with fewer scruples might easily trim one of these into a 6-pointed star shape. Another piece that ...


13

Some of it may be your own perception changing, such as a room you remember being big when you were a kid, but which you find small as an adult. So when you perceive bricks as being softer, it could actually be that they aren't, but that your perception changed. (If you were to walk barefoot on LEGO bricks for one hour per day, your feet would eventually ...


13

If you're after a simple collapsible solution to reach those items just out of reach, you can start with the following setup: You can extend this for quite some way, and use longer bricks or beams throughout if you wish. To finish it off, I'd use a couple of longer bricks with some additional plates on the end to act as fingers, and add some handles (via ...


12

Currently in use: Stud and "antistud" (diameter 4.6mm) Longer studs (Minifig torso) Minifig legs Minifig neck and head / accessory (eg backpack) - also compatible with studs Clip and bar (in a way, similar to stud, but with diameter 3.2mm) Wheels (3.2mm axles) Flower connector (similar, but even smaller, present in a surprising number of parts, including ...


12

Just to add a little to the answer by TheBrickBlogger, the blue piece holding the purple 1x1 slope is likely this one: Here is a really simple example of one of the many ways this can be accomplished: The hollow stud allows positioning to be "jumped". Hope this is helpful :)


11

I can't definitively answer, but I can say that this has been a common observation around the late 1990's and early 2000's-- nothing to do with Chinese manufacturing. I personally made the observation when comparing construction in large-scale creations in 1999/2000 and later in 2005. The large scale creation in 1999/2000 was a very large building, ...


11

I asked one of the set designers at LEGO, Samuel Johnson, on Twitter. Here is our conversation: This to aid in the building flow for children aged 5 and up. Easy to spot on the page, easy to find in the pile of bricks :) — https://twitter.com/Spider_Sam_LEGO/status/1037914372897681409 Ah! Do both the colour and the shape (studless vs studded) ...


11

The black cheese-slope is attached to the stud below, and the purple cheese-slope is attached to the upside-down stud above it. The two cheese slopes are not attached to each other, but are held in place by the studs and the other pieces around them. Cheese-slope techniques have been extensively researched by LEGO fan Katie Walker, who is well known for her ...


10

You might want to look at Flex System tubing. It comes in a variety of lengths (including 6L and 7L) and doesn't have a stopper. For what its worth, this is the technique that Jamie Berard used to create the downspout on the apartment in the Pet Shop:


9

Plastic pieces will become harder over time. Not sure why, but I think it is that the substance that were added to make the plastic a little softer evaporates over time. I have been told that the people designing sets for LEGO never use pieces older than 2 years. This is because harder pieces will have more clutch power than softer pieces and because of ...


9

Here's the simplest way that I can think of to stop the vehicle at the finish line. You'll need basic LEGO Technic parts and a good length of lightweight string or thread. Create two reels for the string. One should be connected to the wheels and the other may turn freely. Wind all the string onto the reel which can spin freely and attach the other end ...


9

I built a similar model to Zhaph's claw arm but with beams and a basic claw attachment: 360° Animation, Demonstration Video I had a few problems operating the claw when I built it again with real bricks. If you collapse the beams too far, it can be difficult to open them again. When you try to pick up items with your tool, you also have to anticipate just ...


9

I don't think there's any LEGO set for which the age target goes any further than 16+. Within the 16+ range, you'll find several sets, mostly in the exclusive sets (series 10xxx): mainly modular houses and some Star Wars UCS sets. Usually these are sets with a high parts count and a price to match. There's a functionality to filter sets by age on shop.lego....


9

The first photo on this page shows the model Andrew Lipson made. The photo is taken under a such angle in respect that the different parts line up in the photo, to get the desired effect. "Waterfall" used a combination of specifically angled photographs, coupled with some post processing to remove the overlapping elements: OK, let's come clean. We ...


9

Going for contrast to help you build? This is probably the primary reason most of the time. One Eurobricks user once said they asked a set designer about it, and they confirmed they do it to makes it easier to follow the instructions: I had an opportunity some time ago to talk to a designer at TLG, and he told me that they use other colors to make it ...


9

This piece is only two plates high, to have another piece in here you would need to stack two plates, which would make the total pieces count rise, or more expensive might be more difficult to tear down by hand probably less sturdy (with a piece on it acting as a lever stacked plates could pry apart) Sets designers are under constraints for both piece ...


8

Everybody else has pretty much said it all, but there is one more thing I can think of. The IR Link Sensor can communicate with Power Functions, RCX, and trains. So you can use three NXT motors, plus, say, two Power Functions motors. (Only the NXTs will have rotations sensors, obviously.) If you already have some PF kit, you will only need the sensor (£40)...


8

As there are more and more LEGO fans who become designers, some of them are already well known from the community and are very dedicated to fans, going to events and the like. They are actually just regular people and always have an amused look if you treat them like they have ascended to godhood status or something. A few of them in no particular order: ...


8

I was able to integrate this into a research project applying context free grammars: This is not a polished software package, and the design is a bit esoteric given that I started with the goal of applying context free grammars to a practical problem. Hopefully there's something in there that may be useful to someone. :)


8

What about the 75930 Indoraptor Rampage for an almost timeless mansion? Without the raptors it is not too expensive. The 10228 Haunted house could provide a good basis for a rebrick of a nice mansion on the hill just outside of your city. However, this one is ALWAYS expensive, as you probably know. For many nice little ideas for everyday items and a MOC ...


8

I'd be tempted to use the Batmobile (76112) design: Basically, you have independent motors for the left and right wheels. This allows you to steer quickly and easily without the fuss of a traditional steering system. The Batmobile is $100 MSRP, and can be found on sale. The included motor controller is Bluetooth based, and can be remote controlled via a ...


8

Everything's going according to plan. Check out Youtuber Sariel's review on your set HERE. At about 26mins in, he addresses your concern. He notes the looseness of the feet when fully deployed, and says there are 4 pads stored in a compartment over the front axle. Just build on.


8

You may want to try Hose, Rigid 3mm D. 6L / 4.8cm or 7-stud long Hose, Rigid 3mm D. 7L / 5.6cm Rigid hoses are the same diameter as bars you've mentioned. However they are hollow. But they are hard so they stay where they should when attached to clips. You can also look at other lengths available on Bricklink.


8

As mentioned in another answer, there are dedicated pieces for this now. But... 6x6x6 cube is plenty big enough to have a stud-reversing construction inside, then the bottom can be a simple 6x6 plate with regular smooth tiles. For example put some of these inside the cube:


8

Yes. 1x1 Brick dimensions are 5x5x6 units. 1x1 Plate/Tile dimensions are 5x5x2 units. Since we have the top surface measured 2x2 studs, this brings us to top with 10x10 units in size. From here we need to construct a side of 10 units too. Taking out top and bottom tiles (10-2-2) we are left with 6 units, which is exactly a height of a brick. Here's an ...


7

The most obvious one I guess is Erling Dideriksen, who was not only a Chief Designer on the LEGO City range, but also designed the element that many refer to as "The Erling Brick". The LEGO Group have also started recently publishing videos of their designers talking about new sets they've worked on (especially the Lord of the Rings sets), which will bring ...


7

A smaller six-pointed star which only uses cheese slopes has been achieved in the MOC below: Flickr: The grand entrance 6, qi_tah


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