Hot answers tagged

25

Added a Ver.2.Oh belowww... Here's the LDD file if you want it. Here's the file for 2nd helpings. Eat up!


23

I've come up with five different ways to make a micro security camera that look like your reference image. I'll run through the different methods in the image above from left to right 1 through 5. Far left camera 1 Tile, Round 1 x 1 in black (the lens), Brick, Round 1 x 1 Open Stud in white (camera body), Plate, Modified 1 x 1 Rounded with Handle in white (...


19

It sounds like you're trying to implement a fairly simple bell mechanism such as this one: You can certainly do this using some string and the pulley element that you mentioned. I'd recommend tying the string to one of the holes in the pulley. Something like this worked reasonably well for me: Here it is in action: You'll likely want to do something to ...


18

While there could be various approaches building studless the easiest one would be with Tile, Modified 2 x 2 Inverted. These modified tiles have studs on one side, which fit under bricks and plates, and smooth surface on the other side. Here is a prototype which features equal 6-stud (or 30 modules) long sides. Parts can be changed upon availability, but it ...


18

I agree with Alex. There's no reason to settle for a ring, when you could use the ring. Here's one way to attach it if you want the ring to look like it is hanging down from the door:


17

Tensegrity Sculpture by JKBrickworks has free instructions. Here you can also get full list of elements you need to build it. Rebrickable has few more "tensegrity" models. All come with instructions and part lists as well as estimated part cost. Example for model shown above: As for acquiring parts there are multiple ways. If you are looking to ...


13

Lack of chains should not be a showstopper for such a project, as any flexible, non-expandable material can work instead. You may use LEGO strings, like those included with Spiderman sets with the tubular grip sections or the plain one: Or in their absence even plain, 3rd party string can work, either tied to, or gripped between LEGO bricks: I have had ...


12

Just to add a little to the answer by TheBrickBlogger, the blue piece holding the purple 1x1 slope is likely this one: Here is a really simple example of one of the many ways this can be accomplished: The hollow stud allows positioning to be "jumped". Hope this is helpful :)


12

Tree Palm Top was used as lanterns in old pirate sets, for example 6285


12

I suggest using 4175 1x2 plate with ladder together with 3839 1x2 plate with handles SNOTted together with the help of 4070 1x1 brick with headlight, one 2x2 plate and 2 1x2 plates, like so: Yes, the whole thing is upside-down. This is normal. This contraption will hold the 2x3 tile snugly, thanks to the offset provided by the lip of the headlight brick. ...


11

I asked one of the set designers at LEGO, Samuel Johnson, on Twitter. Here is our conversation: This to aid in the building flow for children aged 5 and up. Easy to spot on the page, easy to find in the pile of bricks :) — https://twitter.com/Spider_Sam_LEGO/status/1037914372897681409 Ah! Do both the colour and the shape (studless vs studded) contribute to ...


11

As mentioned in another answer, there are dedicated pieces for this now. But... 6x6x6 cube is plenty big enough to have a stud-reversing construction inside, then the bottom can be a simple 6x6 plate with regular smooth tiles. For example put some of these inside the cube:


11

Perhaps Minifigure, Utensil Ring 1 x 1 will be a better fit as it is slightly larger than a stud, while life preserver is 3-4 studs in diameter. Here how it looks when attached to doors you've mentioned:


11

Perhaps something like this using 1x4 arches could work? This does work out to being 2 modules too wide for 1:1 scale with a GameCube, but the trade-off in accuracy may be worth it to you to get the round ports. It appears to be only 1 module wider than your current design. Here's more detail of the build steps: Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Final ...


10

Here's the simplest way that I can think of to stop the vehicle at the finish line. You'll need basic LEGO Technic parts and a good length of lightweight string or thread. Create two reels for the string. One should be connected to the wheels and the other may turn freely. Wind all the string onto the reel which can spin freely and attach the other end ...


10

This piece is only two plates high, to have another piece in here you would need to stack two plates, which would make the total pieces count rise, or more expensive might be more difficult to tear down by hand probably less sturdy (with a piece on it acting as a lever stacked plates could pry apart) Sets designers are under constraints for both piece ...


10

The black cheese-slope is attached to the stud below, and the purple cheese-slope is attached to the upside-down stud above it. The two cheese slopes are not attached to each other, but are held in place by the studs and the other pieces around them. Cheese-slope techniques have been extensively researched by LEGO fan Katie Walker, who is well known for her ...


10

You might want to look at Flex System tubing. It comes in a variety of lengths (including 6L and 7L) and doesn't have a stopper. For what its worth, this is the technique that Jamie Berard used to create the downspout on the apartment in the Pet Shop:


10

Burning oil is the easier of the two, since the basic flame elements can connect into a realistically looking stream of liquid fire: Depicting individual arrows is a lot harder due to the absence of a single arrow piece (aside from the proportionally way oversized harpoon piece), and adding a flame piece is even harder. Your best bet would probably be ...


10

Donny Chen made a LEGO piano that I believe is just large enough to play. Details are available on LEGO Ideas. You can watch him show it off in a video from Brickvention 2019. He has it motorized in that video. From your comments, it sounds like you are interested in not simply having a piano with keys that can move, but one that actually emits proper sound....


10

There is this monstrosity as an example on the internet, which proves that you can work with proper metal strings. But your biggest enemy will be the huge tension everything is under. There is a reason that proper pianos have steel frames. As you only want one or two octaves, you can probably do without reinforcing the frame, but wherever the strings ...


10

Lego bricks are not sized similarly in each dimension. The height to width ratio of a brick is 6:5, which means that 2 bricks stacked on top of each other with their studs up are 6 plates high, but the same 2 bricks stacked on top of each other on their sides (studs facing sideways) are only 5 plates high. Said differently, bricks placed sideways (studs to ...


10

Here's an example of how walls have been built. If you look closely on original pictures you can also see 2 x 2 top hinge piece (marked in Yellow here) used for attaching it on the bottom. Roof is, however, not connected to the top edge. This is how top edge looks on one side of the roof as it is made out of Technic pieces, mostly: Parts are: 4623a or ...


10

You could loosely stack Brick, Round 1 x 1 Open Stud around a core Hose, Rigid 3mm D.. As long as the stack is loose, you should be able to bend the trunk to your desired shape. As a bonus, you get the segmented look of the trunk for free. A reference photo: Or if your scale is smaller, maybe consider Hose, Ribbed 7mm D..


9

The first photo on this page shows the model Andrew Lipson made. The photo is taken under a such angle in respect that the different parts line up in the photo, to get the desired effect. "Waterfall" used a combination of specifically angled photographs, coupled with some post processing to remove the overlapping elements: OK, let's come clean. We ...


9

Going for contrast to help you build? This is probably the primary reason most of the time. One Eurobricks user once said they asked a set designer about it, and they confirmed they do it to makes it easier to follow the instructions: I had an opportunity some time ago to talk to a designer at TLG, and he told me that they use other colors to make it ...


9

Here's a design I've been using, based on this model by Lambert Varias: It's not a perfect circle, but it is relatively small all things considered: It's pretty simple, but here's a partial disassembled version to better show what goes into it: Parts shown: 1x 55013 2x 4265c 2x 57585 6x 32013 6x 32556 12x 42610 12x 50945


9

1989's Eldorado Fortress from the Pirates universe had torches made from part 3959 with a single transparent stud on the "top", with the entire assembly pushed into an Erling brick. You can get a similar effect by clipping a lightsaber hilt piece to the wall or putting it onto a post. Just add a suitable flame piece (or simple stud) coming out of one end. ...


9

The "wheels" are really the hubs, mostly from the various Speed Champions cars among others. The inside of the wheel takes a standard stud, so you should be able to use: Plate Modified 2x2 with Pin Hole Technic Pin 1/2 Wheel Cover 5 Spoke Beyond the primary question of how to build these particular wheels, there are a few common themes among wheels and ...


9

Yes it fits in, here are a few official sets that do exactly that https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?S=60133-23 https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?S=coltlbm2-14


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible